Ask the Perf Guy: Sizing Exchange 2016 Deployments


Uh oh. You are probably thinking to yourself, here comes another one of those incredibly long blog posts about sizing. Thankfully, it’s not. If you want to fully understand the sizing process for Exchange 2016, you are certainly welcome to read the previous post that I did for Exchange 2013, as the overall process is effectively the same with one major caveat. Since we have eliminated the CAS role in Exchange 2016, you must follow the process for multi-role deployment sizing.

Overall, the inputs to our sizing formulas stay the same from Exchange 2013 to Exchange 2016. This means that our IOPS requirements, memory requirements, and all of the other values provided in the Exchange 2013 sizing guidance should continue to be used for Exchange 2016. We are changing one set of inputs, however.

Processor requirements

We are slightly increasing the processor requirements for Exchange 2016 (compared to Exchange 2013) as this is a very new release, and we are still learning how it performs in production. This slight increase in CPU provides some additional headroom for unanticipated issues, and may be changed in the future as we learn more from our internal deployments as well as customer feedback. The same SPECint_rate2006 baseline value described in the Exchange 2013 guidance should continue to be used (33.75 per-core).

Messages sent or received
per mailbox per day
Mcycles per User, Active DB Copy
or Standalone
Mcycles per User,
Passive DB Copy
50 2.99 0.70
100 5.97 1.40
150 8.96 2.10
200 11.94 2.80
250 14.93 3.50
300 17.91 4.20
350 20.90 4.90
400 23.88 5.60
450 26.87 6.30
500 29.85 7.00

These changes are reflected in v7.8 and later in the calculator.

System scalability

The previously released guidance on maximum recommended cores and maximum memory size for Exchange 2013 also applies to Exchange 2016. As we continue to evolve the hardware platform that we use for Exchange Online, we will update this guidance, but for now you should be planning deployments around these existing recommendations.

Summary

If you are at all familiar with the process for sizing the last couple of Exchange releases, you will be very comfortable with Exchange 2016. As with any new release, you should plan to roll-out in stages and monitor the health and performance of the solution carefully. We do expect that our performance and scalability guidance for Exchange 2016 will evolve over the lifespan of the product so watch the Exchange team blog for future updates.

Jeff Mealiffe
Principal PM Manager
Office 365 Customer Experience

Comments (3)
  1. Jeff, thanks for sharing and the updated information regarding the calculator.

  2. Thanks Jeff,
    It’s been a great help to all of us who requires Exchange on premise as messaging solution for enterprise.

    KUDOS to Jeff and Team!!!

  3. Satyajit321 says:

    Phew! Finally we have it, the easy way.

Comments are closed.