Fibonacci Numbers


I know it's out of left field, but I thought it would be fun to share. In my daily work, I'm finding that more often than not Scrum is the de facto standard framework for dealing with complex software products. Although strictly speaking not a part of Scrum itself, the game of Planning Poker is often used to estimate feature delivery time. In it, Fibonacci numbers are used (0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144) as an agreed-upon estimation unit (such as duration days or story points). Fibonacci numbers are used there to reflect the inherent uncertainty in estimating larger items (the longer an estimate is, the more uncertainty it contains). In the Scrum Poker app I'm using, for some reason a small variation on the Fibonacci sequence is used, namely: 0, ½, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 20, 40, 100, a ? (unsure) and a coffee cup (I need a break) and I've read on Wikipedia that more Scrum Poker apps are doing this.

Anyway, recently I was on holiday visiting Pisa and Florence, and I came upon this statue of Fibonacci and I thought that was really cool so I took a picture. Now, most of my friends are really not interested in this sort of stuff so I was wondering who I could bother with this. Finally, it came to me :-).

More and more Microsoft technologies are relying on agile methodologies (like Scrum). The reason is abundantly clear. Power BI updates twice a month, and at least one Azure service updates almost every week or two!

See the Power BI Portal:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/24166.power-bi-portal.aspx

And the Azure Portal:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/23120.microsoft-azure-portal.aspx

Comments (10)

  1. Davut EREN - TAT says:

    Strange; Thank you very much Margriet!

  2. Saeid Hasani says:

    Great post and nice picture!
    Thanks Margriet! 🙂

  3. Durval Ramos says:

    Margriet, I wonder how was your feeling to be close… not only in the statue of Fibonacci, but also the environment in which he lived…

    Many centuries of influence to reach the most modern work methodologies (for IT and others).

    You lived in Pisa and Florence a great privilege!!!

    Thanks for sharing

  4. Ed Price - MSFT says:

    Wait, which one are you in the picture?

    Seriously(ish), though, more and more Microsoft technologies are relying on agile methodologies. The reason is abundantly clear. Power BI updates twice a month, and at least one Azure service updates almost every week or two!

    See the Power BI Portal:
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/24166.power-bi-portal.aspx

    And the Azure Portal:
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/23120.microsoft-azure-portal.aspx

  5. Carmelo La Monica says:

    Great! Thanks Margriet 🙂

  6. Margriet Bruggeman says:

    Thanks guys!!

  7. pituach says:

    Thanks for sharing 😉

  8. Mustafa YUKSEL says:

    Thanks for share Margriet.

  9. Jayakumaur (JK) says:

    Wow great photo Margriet!! Thanks for sharing 🙂 Really must have been good (and proud ofc!) to have taken this!!

  10. Jayakumaur (JK) says:

    Anyways, speaking of the estimation, do you happen to use any other means for estimation other than planning poker for the scrum process as such?