Wiki Life: Speling an gamma, it is umpotant?


You just finished witting an awesome article, what should you do next? Get up from your desk and stretch your legs? No! Check the spelling and grammar!

How many Microsoft KB articles or Wikipedia articles do you read with spelling or grammatical mistakes? How do you feel when you read an article that has bad grammar or poor spelling? Rightly or wrongly, does it give you confidence in the author? If the spelling and grammar are especially bad, you might even end up confused.

Part of writing a credible and professional article is checking your spelling and grammar are correct!

Spelling and grammar are important, and ensure:

1. your article looks professional and creditable
2. the reader clearly understands what you're writing about

There are many tools you can use to check spelling and grammar. It's quick and easy to do, and should be something that you do as a habit after writing an article!

Here is a short list of tools you can use (I'm sure there's many more out there, so if you have a favourite one that isn't on the list, please add it to the comments!).

For those (amazing) people who translate articles, the task is harder. It can be especially hard when it comes to getting the grammar correct for a foreign language! If you need help with this, try partnering with a Wiki author who speaks the language natively. They might be willing to proof read the article for you once you've finished the initial translation! That's a benefit of being in a community; helping each other!

Other Posts in this Series:

Comments (27)

  1. Peter Geelen - MSFT says:

    Me like this! 😉
    Great stuff!

  2. Zeca Lima says:

    Good job Matthew.

  3. Shanky_621 says:

    Thanks Matt,
    Thanks I am lttle bad at punctuation.will surely go and look again my article today for grammar and Selling.BTW catchy tagline for the post :)

  4. Shanky_621 says:

    See above bears fact that I am bad at spelling 😉

  5. Ed Price - MSFT says:

    Yess. Speling an gramrrr es vewy umpotant!!

  6. Matthew Yarlett says:

    Ha ha, Shanks Thanky! 😉

  7. Matthew Yarlett says:

    Ed, you sound like Elmer Fudd when you write like that! ;->

  8. Matthew Yarlett says:

    Lol! I love the way you wrote point 3! To quote just part of it; “typose are found all the thyme!”

  9. pituach says:

    Hi,
    You should to remember that some of the active users, which post every month, are not native English speakers! Therefore unfortunately, grammar mistakes is part of the writing. For example, I use Google translator before posting usually. This is helping for the spelling, but not for the grammar, since there is no good automatic translator from English to Hebrew and vice-versa from Hebrew to English (last time I checked Google is doing the best job).
    What is better solution: (1) stop writing although your articles are unique and professionally contribute to the community. or (2) Other contributors which speak native English will help in proofreading (this is working great for now, I can point on 2-3 people which are doing great job in this issue as well as in other contributions).

  10. Matthew Yarlett says:

    Pituach, totally agree! Translating is very valuable, and getting grammar correct in a foreign language can be difficult.

    Partnering with a second author (who natively speaks the language being translated into) is a great idea!

  11. Alan Nascimento Carlos says:

    Good job Matthew!

  12. Ed Price - MSFT says:

    “Partnering with a second author (who natively speaks the language being translated into) is a great idea!”

    I agree! This is a great solution! What does everyone think? What about a forum thread (stickied) on the TechNet Wiki Discussion forum for signing up people to edit articles for non-native English authors?

    Should this be a forum thread or a Wiki article with a sign-up table?

    If it’s a Wiki article, we’d need to ask everyone to turn on the email notifications of edits so that they know when someone is connecting with them (when an author signs up for the English editor to help or when the English editor signs up to help an author).

    Thoughts? Great discussion, Pituach and Matthew!

  13. pituach says:

    Of course I’m voting for it.

    About where to put the list, I think using an article in WIKI is more suitable. And the method could be as follows:

    1. Who writes an article and like someone to proofread it, will add it to the list of articles for proofreading.
    2. Native language speaker (an Hebrew speaker if the article in Hebrew, an English speaker is the article in English, etc) contributor that see that list could choose an article and help improve it by proofread.
    3. Once performs the proofreading, he will move the article to a second list of articles ready after proofreading.

    * This way is easy to keep track of what need to perform and who performed what.

    I allowed myself to prepare the first draft of the article :-)
    Please check if this matches or delete it.
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/23908.articles-list-for-proofreading.aspx

    ** I added my last article as an example

  14. Ed Price - MSFT says:

    Pituach,

    That’s awesome! We’ll promote that and get it out! I’ll blog about this on Thursday.

    That’s a total Wiki-leadership-like thing to do! So I’ll follow up with you in the future about that as well.

    FYI –

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/18105.wiki-ninjas-blog-how-to-become-an-author.aspx

  15. Matthew Yarlett says:

    Nice work Ed and Pituach!

  16. pituach says:

    Hi Ed

    1. I recommend to remove this part “(or poor at grammar)”. I dont care to shout that my English is not perfect (To say the least), Although I have clients outside to Israel, and we speaks only English (none from US at this time, and they probably dont speak English much better). Most people do want to shout that they need help, moreover to point a specific limitation. They will not feel good to say “I have a poor grammer” but at the same time they will have no problem in saying: I want someone to proofread my article (without a specific reason).

    2. A proofread is something that a native speaker may ask for as well. any newspaper’s writer know that it is best to get proofread and any newspaper editor do it. This is not because they are not native speaker, but because proofread bring another perspective (same with developing bug monitoring by the way).

    3. regarding the blog I will be happy to write blogs at the Microsoft blog’s system. I actually read this blog several month ago (I asked Naomi about writing blogs and she pointed me to this article). At that time I did not meet the requirements (It was about the time I posted my first article). In conclusion, I will be happy to take part part in this. Please inform me if you open a blog for me.

    4. Specifically about my article, It look like Naomi (as most of articles) proofread it yesterday. She probably dont know about this thread and did not move it to second list (I guess it is ready).

  17. pituach says:

    Thanks Matthew :-)

  18. Anonymous says:

    The background is that Matthew wrote this blog post: Wiki Life: Speling an gamma, it is umpotant?

  19. hassan sayed issa20014 says:

    NICE JOB congratulations!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!

  20. Anonymous says:

    Yep, that's right! That's the beauty of a wiki! A single author creates an article, but a community

  21. hassan sayed issa20014 says:

    Congratulations

  22. Anonymous says:

    Earlier this year I wrote a series of posts about writing good articles. It’s been a while since

  23. Anonymous says:

    Due to some practical issues while switching screens during presentation, the recording of the screen

  24. Anonymous says:

    Due to some practical issues while switching screens during presentation, the recording of the screen