Localization, globalization and localizability

The term localization describes the translation and adaptation for a local market of a program originally developed in a different market and in a different language, usually English. Localization activities include translating the user interface, resizing dialog boxes, customizing features (if necessary), and testing results to ensure that the program still works, as well as…

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Terms under the spotlight

This page is a compilation of the “terms of the month” featured in the Microsoft Language Portal. It includes the following terms: BreadcrumbCookieNudgeRibbonTag cloudTapWizard   Breadcrumb The term breadcrumb navigation was coined in reference to the Hansel and Gretel fairy tale, by analogy to the trail of breadcrumbs that the children left in the forest…

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Terminology management methods in the localization process

This article first appeared in the Microsoft Language Portal. It briefly summarizes the main terminology management methods in the localization process and highlights the differences between the semasiological and onomasiological approaches. Terminology management in the localization process has changed considerably over the years, both in the methods used and in the different phases of the product…

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Guidelines for globalizing security-related content

This article first appeared in the Microsoft Language Portal. In software development, there are regulations and initiatives that emphasize the security, privacy, and availability of software. What role do content creators play in supporting this initiative? The security-related content provided by content creators – product documentation, white papers, and Web content – directly contributes to…

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Is your content ready for globalization?

This article first appeared in the Microsoft Language Portal. Hardly a day goes by that we don’t hear something about globalization and how it is impossible for companies to overlook the importance of building products and services for a global market. The reasons are simple: Software and web application customers are no longer confined by…

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Terminology management at Microsoft

This article first appeared in the Microsoft Language Portal. It describes how Microsoft terminology gets from the drawing board to the people outside Microsoft who need it – third-party software developers, user interface designers, and language professionals. The Microsoft Language Excellence group owns and maintains a multilingual, concept-oriented, terminology database. The Language Excellence group’s mission is…

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