Additional information about CVE-2014-6324


Today Microsoft released update MS14-068 to address CVE-2014-6324, a Windows Kerberos implementation elevation of privilege vulnerability that is being exploited in-the-wild in limited, targeted attacks. The goal of this blog post is to provide additional information about the vulnerability, update priority, and detection guidance for defenders. Microsoft recommends customers apply this update to their domain controllers as quickly as possible.


Vulnerability Details

CVE-2014-6324 allows remote elevation of privilege in domains running Windows domain controllers. An attacker with the credentials of any domain user can elevate their privileges to that of any other account on the domain (including domain administrator accounts).

The exploit found in-the-wild targeted a vulnerable code path in domain controllers running on Windows Server 2008R2 and below. Microsoft has determined that domain controllers running 2012 and above are vulnerable to a related attack, but it would be significantly more difficult to exploit. Non-domain controllers running all versions of Windows are receiving a “defense in depth” update but are not vulnerable to this issue.

Before talking about the specific vulnerability, it will be useful to have a basic understanding of how Kerberos works.

 


One point not illustrated in the diagram above is that both the TGT and Service Ticket contain a blob of data called the PAC (Privilege Attribute Certificate). A PAC contains (among other things):

  • The user’s domain SID
  • The security groups the user is a member of

 

When a user first requests a TGT from the KDC, the KDC puts a PAC (containing the user’s security information) into the TGT. The KDC signs the PAC so it cannot be tampered with. When the user requests a Service Ticket, they use their TGT to authenticate to the KDC. The KDC validates the signature of the PAC contained in the TGT and copies the PAC into the Service Ticket being created.

When the user authenticates to a service, the service validates the signature of the PAC and uses the data in the PAC to create a logon token for the user. As an example, if the PAC has a valid signature and indicates that “Sue” is a member of the “Domain Admins” security group, the logon token created for “Sue” will be a member of the “Domain Admins” group.

CVE-2014-6324 fixes an issue in the way Windows Kerberos validates the PAC in Kerberos tickets. Prior to the update it was possible for an attacker to forge a PAC that the Kerberos KDC would incorrectly validate. This allows an attacker to remotely elevate their privilege against remote servers from an unprivileged authenticated user to a domain administrator.

  

Update Priority

  1. Domain controllers running Windows Server 2008R2 and below
  2. Domain controllers running Windows Server 2012 and higher
  3. All other systems running any version of Windows

 

Detection Guidance

Companies currently collecting event logs from their domain controllers may be able to detect signs of exploitation pre-update. Please note that this logging will only catch known exploits; there are known methods to write exploits that will bypass this logging.

 


The key piece of information to note in this log entry is that the “Security ID” and “Account Name” fields do not match even though they should. In the screenshot above, the user account “nonadmin” used this exploit to elevate privileges to “TESTLAB\Administrator”.

After installing the update, for Windows 2008R2 and above, the 4769 Kerberos Service Ticket Operation event log can be used to detect attackers attempting to exploit this vulnerability. This is a high volume event, so it is advisable to only log failures (this will significantly reduce the number of events generated).

 

After installing the update, exploitation attempts will result in the “Failure Code” of “0xf” being logged. Note that this error code can also be logged in other extremely rare circumstances. So, while there is a chance that this event log could be generated in non-malicious scenarios, there is a high probability that an exploitation attempt is the cause of the event.

 

Remediation

The only way a domain compromise can be remediated with a high level of certainty is a complete rebuild of the domain. An attacker with administrative privilege on a domain controller can make a nearly unbounded number of changes to the system that can allow the attacker to persist their access long after the update has been installed. Therefore it is critical to install the update immediately.

 

Additional Notes

Azure Active Directory does not expose Kerberos over any external interface and is therefore not affected by this vulnerability.

 

Joe Bialek, MSRC Engineering

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