Exchange 2010 Default Connector Configuration


This post is to provide a quick reference to the Exchange 2010 Hub Transport default send and receive connector configuration.  There will be a separate one for Exchange 2013 and 2016.

When installing the Exchange 2010 Hub Transport role, two receive connectors are created on each server.  They are called:

  • Client   <ServerName>
  • Default <ServerName>

In the below example, the Exchange 2010 Hub Transport server is imaginatively called E2K10.

We could get the same information, and more, using PowerShell though the UI does allow the information to be displayed in a convenient manner.  For reference the PowerShell is below should you want it:

Get-ReceiveConnector –Identity “E2K10\Default E2K10”
Get-ReceiveConnector –Identity “E2K10\Client E2K10”

Default Send Connector

Just like in the Matrix where there is no spoon, there is no default send connector to route mail to the Internet.  This does not exist by default and must be manually created.

If you do have one, then this connect may have been created on a different version of Exchange or on a different Exchange 2010 server.  The below is a lab with the default configuration.

Exchange 2010 - No Internet Send Connector By Default

What does exist is the implicit intra organisation send connector so that Exchange can send messages internally.  The intra organisation connector is not visible in the Exchange Management Console; it is configured in PowerShell.  This can be seen below.

Get-TransportServer | Select IntraOrgConnector*

Implicit Send Connector

Default Receive Connectors Overview

You will note that two receive connectors are created by default on each 2010 Hub transport server.  Why are there two?

Exchange 2010 Default Receive Connectors

The “Default <ServerName>” connector is set to use port TCP 25.  This is the standard SMTP port used for server to server SMTP in Exchange.

The connector which is entitled “Client <ServerName>” is intended to be used for client SMTP submission.  POP and IMAP are client download protocols.  They cannot send email, such clients use SMTP to send.  Recent changes to the SMTP standards defined SMTP client submission which uses a different port than regular SMTP.  The port used is typically TCP 587.  As you will see in the screen shots below, different authentication options are also enabled on the Client receive connector.

Receive Connector – Default

The below screenshots illustrate the configuration of the “Default <ServerName>” Receive Connector.

In Exchange 2010 the Default Hub Transport Receive Connector does not accept anonymous email.  It is set to receive email from all IPv4 and IPv6 source addresses.  It is intended that Exchange to Exchange server SMTP flow should use this connector so that the Exchange servers can authenticate with each other.  This is required for several features such as Shadowing.

Protocol logging is not enabled by default on the send or receive connectors.  This should be enable to facilitate troubleshooting as discussed in Exchange 2010 Tips & Tweaks.

General Tab

Deafult Receive Connector - General Tab

Network Tab

Deafult Receive Connector - Network Tab

Authentication Tab

Deafult Receive Connector - Authentication Tab

Permission Groups Tab

Deafult Receive Connector - Permission Groups Tab

Receive Connector – Client

The below screenshots illustrate the configuration of the “Client <ServerName> Receive Connector.

As with the Default connector, logging is not enabled by default and it also accepts mail from all IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.

General Tab

Client Receive Connector - General Tab

Network Tab

Client Receive Connector - Network Tab

Authentication Tab

Client Receive Connector - Authentication Tab

Permission Groups Tab

Client Receive Connector - Permission Groups Tab

Bootnote

As an aside, the SMTP standard was defined in RFC 821 then updated in RFC 2821 and RFC 5321.  The initial RFCs are made obsolete by the newer ones.

Page 65 of RFC 821 notes that the protocol specification was not hardcoded to a single transport protocol.

transport service

Any reliable stream-oriented data communication services. For example, NCP, TCP, NITS.

While the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority has allocated port 25 for both TCP and UDP for use by SMTP, Exchange uses TCP.

Cheers,

Rhoderick

Comments (2)

  1. Anonymous says:
    (The content was deleted per user request)
  2. Nice article Rhoderick!! Apart the verbose log, is there any possibilities to change anything into the Intra-Org ? I never found it on ADSI.edit. Regards the Exchange 2013 and 2016, there is many layers which the Intra-org is used, from the mailbox submission to transport service, from the transport service to mailbox delivery, from the transport service to front-end transport service, etc. The question is, is there more than one intra-org in those cases or it’s just one that cover all mail-flow? Thanks!!

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