Fine Grained Control When Registering Multiple IP Addresses–Part Deux


30-1-2013 Edit – Link to part 3 is here.

 

In the Exchange 2007 and 2010 world there are definite scenarios where there is a need to add multiple IP addresses to a server so that we can assign specific IP addresses to different web sites.  However we do not want clients resolving the Exchange server to multiple A records and getting into a tizzy.

You can a review a previous blog post that I wrote on new functionality that was added to Windows 2008 and Windows 2008 R2 via an update that allows only allowed IP addresses to be registered into DNS.  This is a boon especially if you only have a single NIC.

 

Windows 2012 has this functionality, and also embraces the PowerShell paradigm by providing the same functionality in a PowerShell Cmdlet.  Lets review Netsh first then move to PowerShell.

 

Kicking It Old School

In the below screen shot you can see the Skip As Source parameter:

image

As a recap, to add the address using Netsh:

Netsh Int IPv4 Add Address <Interface Name> <ip address> SkipAsSource=True

"Interface Name" is the name of the interface for which you want to add a new IP address.

"IP address" is the IP address you want to add to this interface

 

In my case this was the command used:

Netsh Int IPv4 Add Address Ethernet 192.168.2.201 SkipAsSource=True

 

And the results can be seen below:

image

 

And should you want to remove the IPv4 address using Netsh:

Netsh Int IPv4 Delete Address Ethernet 192.168.2.201

 

Enter The PowerShell

In PowerShell we can achieve the same by leveraging the New-NetIPAddress Cmdlet.  First up, let’s take a look at the existing IP addresses via the Get-NetIPAddress cmdlet, and note the current IP of 192.168.2.246 has a value of $False in the SkipAsSource field.

image

 

Now let’s add the additional IP address in with the New-NetIPAddress Cmdlet:

 

image

New-NetIPAddress -IPAddress 192.168.2.201 -InterfaceAlias Ethernet -SkipAsSource $True

We can see that the SkipAsSource field is set to $True in the above screen shot, and the result is also shown in the Get-NetIPAddress Cmdlet:

image

Get-NetIPAddress 192.168.2.201

Conclusion

Now you go to parties and impress people with how to add IPs and not have then register into DNS.

Cheers,

Rhoderick

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