The Washington Post Debuts A Real-Time Political Lie-Detector Prototype Named "Truth Teller"

This is a guest post by Lewis Shepherd, the Director of Microsoft’s Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments, based in Washington DC (with offices in Redmond, WA and the UK). You can follow him on Twitter at @lewisshepherd. This post originally appeared on his blog, Shepherd’s Pi. I like writing about cool applications of technology that are so pregnant with the…

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Breaking Down MeriTalk's sCIOal (Social) Circle Study

How good are Federal government Chief Information Officers (CIOs) at social media? That was the question posed by media company MeriTalk in their recent study, named sCIOal Circle (get it?). According to the study (registration required), this is the first of an annual series of analyses. Thus, before the next one, it’s worth looking into…

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Open Science: Four Lessons You Can Learn From the Princeton Professor With the Best Laboratory Website Ever

When you think about the kinds of people who have beautiful, interactive websites, you’re probably more likely to think about artists, designers, or architects than scientists or engineers. But Dr. Ethan Perlstein, an evolutionary pharmacologist working on yeast at Princeton University, may just just have the coolest academic lab website I’ve ever seen. Academics tend…

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Research Grants 2.0: Should Governments Crowdsource Science Research Funding?

Recently, I wrote about the trials and tribulations of social networks focused on scientific researchers. I painted a fairly dim picture. Some people disagreed with me at the Huffington Post and other places. Nevertheless, it is clear that there are those in the scientific community who are interested in disruptive innovation within a somewhat traditional…

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Living Science: Why Social Networks For Scientists Don't Work (Yet)

A “Facebook for Scientists”? It may sound silly, or redundant, but it’s becoming more of a reality. Maybe. A new startup based in Germany named ResearchGate has already convinced roughly 1.4 million researchers to become members and begin sharing. On it, you can search your email accounts to find people you know, read PDF documents…

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Cybersafety: Microsoft Releases New Index Gauging Online Behaviors

Guest post by Jacqueline Beauchere, Director of Trustworthy Computing, Privacy & Safety Communications for the Microsoft Corporation. In October, National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) in the U.S., Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing Group announced a new tool named the Microsoft Computing Safety Index (MSCI) to help gauge how consumers are meeting the challenges of today’s digital…

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Sand Table 2.0: Modern Warfighters Connecting With Open Government And Big Data

Guest post by Phil West, a senior technology architect with the Microsoft Office of Civic Innovation.This article was originally published in slightly different form at FutureFed. In the days of General Eisenhower, war planners used small 3D models embedded in sand — a sand table — to understand and prepare for battle or other operations….

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Magic Ampersand: How Microsoft Research Combines Basic Research With Applied Development

Guest post by Lewis Shepherd, Director of the Microsoft Institute for Advanced Research in Government. This article previously appeared at his website Shepherd’s Pi. Follow him on Twitter at @lewisshepherd. According to Wikipedia, the lowly ampersand or “&” is a logogram representing the conjunction word “and” using ”a ligature of the letters in et,” which is of course…

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Pew And Microsoft Launch The Voting Information Project To Change How Voters Get Election-Day Information

Guest post by Kim Nelson, the Executive Director of eGovernment for Microsoft’s State and Local Government business. A version of this article originally appeared at the Bright Side of Government blog. In the run-up to the 2008 elections, approximately 120 million people went online seeking information about the general election, and four out of five…

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Should Researchers Perform Biocomputation In The Cloud To Deal With A Biological Data Tsunami?

More data is being produced, analyzed, shared, and stored than ever before. Scientific research, particularly biological sciences like genomics, is one of the more prominent examples of this, with laboratories producing teraBY a, a, part, Dan described above – use BLAST to sift through large databases, identify new animal species,improve drug effectiveness,produce biofuels, and much…

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