Running a Service with Large, Low Cost Mailboxes

This video provides some answers to the question we’ve heard a lot – How can you provide large mailboxes in the service at such a low cost? In the video, I talk about some of the ways that enable us to get the costs of our service so low, which helps us provide a low…

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Shifting to a Services Culture

In my last Geek Out video we talked about the interesting technical differences in building a service versus building software for companies to run on-premises. This time we spend some time talking about the cultural shift the team went through as services became one of the main products of the Exchange team and the key…

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Special Edition Geek Out with Perry – TechEd North America 2011

During TechEd North America in Atlanta earlier this year, Ann Vu invited attendees to record the questions they wanted me to answer.  When she got back, she interrupted a meeting I was having in my office with Matt Gossage to get some answers to questions about long-term email preservation, database recovery, clustering concepts, site resiliency,…

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High Availability for the Exchange Service

It has been a while since my last posting.  We have been pretty busy dotting the i’s on the new Office 365 service, and deploying the beta (which has gone very smoothly). The conversation this time is centered on the framework through which we have tackled the challenges of making sure that we can deliver…

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New Scalable Exchange Server 2010 Solution from HP

It is pretty exciting to see HP release a new hardware solution that provides a simple scalable solution to build the smallest and largest Exchange deployments.  This new solution maps closely to the architectural building block concept that I’ve written about in the past – Blog Post: Exchange Mailbox Storage Bricks  I think what is…

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Multi-Release Strategies and Role Based Access Control

Following the ‘why we built Exchange the way we did’ theme, I wanted to take some time to explain some architectural changes that have been made to Exchange over successive releases. After Exchange 2003 shipped we took a step back and assessed the state of the code base.  At that point, Exchange had grown fairly…

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