Office 365 Connectivity Guidance: Part 3

3. Unhindered access to the endpoints required. The next principle is to get your traffic to Microsoft as unhindered as possible, this means minimising the work done on the traffic or ensuring any work done doesn’t cause an impact to that traffic. When moving to the cloud it’s worth having a rethink about how you…

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Office 365 Connectivity Guidance: Part 4

4. Local DNS resolution Finally, local DNS resolution is a necessity to ensure Microsoft can connect your clients to resources based on their location. Many cloud services use this method, for example, we currently use Geo DNS for Exchange Online to connect your clients to the nearest front-end server for the service. I’ve covered this…

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Office 365 Connectivity Guidance: Part 2

2. Localized network egress as close to the user as possible To enable your user’s traffic to take full advantage of Microsoft’s global network, ideally, we’d want their traffic to egress locally and thus peer onto Microsoft’s network as quickly and as closely as possible. However, backhauling to a centralized internet egress is common for…

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Office 365 Connectivity Guidance

It’s been a while since my last blog post, mainly because my online effort has been going into our official guidance around Expressroute. http://aka.ms/tune/ and www.office.com However, one area I felt it would be worthwhile expending some effort on writing up whilst we work on more verbose guidance is, how to connect to your Office…

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HTTP Flood Mitigation causing slow Exchange Mailbox Migrations to Office 365

It's been a while since I've updated this blog as I've been busy rolling out content internally in Microsoft to help our customers connect to our cloud services. I do have some new tips around checking routing and ISP performance that I'll write up soon and publish. However, my colleagues have run into an issue…

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How to analyse Application level performance for Outlook and SharePoint online

If we've stepped through all the network level checks and all looks good from that perspective, then we need to move up the stack to the application itself and see if something above the network is causing performance issues. This can prove tricky with Office 365 as the information is almost always encrypted within an…

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Checking your TCP Packets are pulling their weight (TCP Max Segment Size or MSS)

This is a quick one to check to ensure your TCP packets are able to contain the maximum amount of data possible, low values in this area will severely affect network performance. Maximum Segment size or MSS is a TCP level value which is the largest segment which can be sent on the link minus…

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Ensuring your TCP stack isn’t throwing data away

Fw In my previous blog post, I discussed checking the MSS to ensure full sized packets are used. Well, whilst you're digging around in the TCP Options of the SYN-SYN/ACK packets, it's worth checking another option SACK or Selective Acknowledgement. As you most likely know, TCP is a reliable protocol, in that it ensures delivery…

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Ensuring your Proxy server can scale to handle Office 365 traffic

Proxy servers are often in place at customer sites, happily ticking away handling Internet traffic for years before Office 365 came along. As Office 365 generally travels over port 443 (for Outlook and SharePoint at least) then what’s to think about? Your proxy can handle this like any other SSL traffic right? Well, yes technically…

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