Troubleshooting Windows AutoPilot: Sample ETW Traces


In yesterday’s AutoPilot troubleshooting blog, https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mniehaus/2017/12/13/troubleshooting-windows-autopilot-level-300400/, I showed a variety of captured traces for AutoPilot (and one non-AutoPilot) deployment scenario, which required actually reproducing some different scenarios, including some failure cases.  As some of those aren’t particularly simple to reproduce outside of a lab environment (where you can purposely reconfigure Azure AD or Intune), a few people requested copies of those traces – analyzing the failures without having to cause the failures, as an educational exercise.  So, here they are; download the zip file at the bottom of this blog.

Here’s a quick overview of the included traces, all of which were captured from (unpatched) Windows 10 Enterprise 1709 virtual machines:

  • 1629915.NoAutoPilot.etl.  This trace was captured from a VM that is not known to AutoPilot (hash was never captured or uploaded).  The device went through the standard OOBE process, manually.
  • 1629915.Success.etl.  This is a normal, successful AutoPilot deployment (hash was captured and uploaded, with an AutoPilot profile of settings applied).  The device went through the optimized OOBE process.
  • 1629915.801C0003.etl.  This trace, from the same VM as the success case, shows what happens when the user does not have the ability to join Azure AD.
  • 1629915.801C0003-5limit.etl. This trace, also from the same VM as the success case, shows what happens when the user can join no additional machines to Azure AD (device limit was set to 5 in Azure AD, this would have been device #6).  (From what I can tell, this trace is identical to the previous one, which just indicates that there is no way to tell the difference between the two failure scenarios.)
  • 1629915.80180018.etl.  This trace, also from the same VM as the success case, shows what happens if you take away the Azure AD Premium or Intune license from the user who was setting up the device.  (They did again have rights to join Azure AD.  I only captured one trace, even though I did run through both scenarios separately – once I saw that “no AAD Premium license” and “no Intune license” returned the same error, I didn’t bother capturing a second trace.)

Let me know if you find any other interesting tidbits in these traces.

AutoPilotTraces


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