No payment necessary: Fighting back against ransomware


Any IT professional who’s ever had an experience with malware knows how fast an intrusive attack can happen, and how difficult it can be to educate employees to be vigilant against such threats. And with ransomware attacks only growing, having information, tools and technologies to help protect your network can mean the difference between serious business disruption and business as usual.

Those of us in the Microsoft Malware Protection Center are constantly on the hunt for new malware variants, and working to improve Microsoft’s security-oriented technology to block them from reaching our customers.

In that vein, we just released a new white paper that details a full set of technologies Microsoft has developed or enhanced to provide Windows customers with an array of protection options.

Please check out the Windows Business blog from Rob Lefferts “Defending against ransomware with Windows 10 Anniversary Update“, which offers an overview of those protections. You can also read the full white paper “Ransomware protection in Windows 10 Anniversary Update (PDF).

 

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Comments (5)

  1. vernon says:

    I have a screen telling me a trogan is installed and I must call to have it removed my access is totally blocked

  2. SchoolAdmin says:

    Although every new Windows release is a possibility to harden it, I think many of your (business) customers will currently prefer using Windows 7 because of compatibility with existing programs, old hardware, lack of support for Windows 10 by their “upstream” service desk/vendors of the business critical applications and because of the fact that they don’t want to have a downtime every year because of the lenghty upgrade process (1511, 1607) with the possibility of business critical programs (or hardware components) being non-functioning afterwards (or computers not booting anymore).

    So I think it would help your customer base when you would provide them with instructions to harden their currently used Windows version and not only marketing the hardening features of Windows 10 (although it probably will be the only working way using Windows in the mid/long term future).

    (I think of all the home user computers having a buggy Microsoft Update engine which causes them to be on patch level of June or earlier, because the fix from KB3172605 (thank you to the product team for finally releasing it) hasn’t found the way to them, because you decided to not deliver it via Microsoft Update self-update and the search takes too much hours to be finished before the user shuts down the computer (and to manually install it someone has to know to terminate the internet connection and to reboot the computer without internet access to prevent the background search from blocking the manual installation))

    Another point I don’t understand is the integration of Adobe Flash Player in Windows (since W8). It surely was a good idea before Adobe had made their own updater which finally was able to keep Flash Player current without the need for an Administrator to enter his credentials or to manually push an update. But today as it is being replaced by HTML5 and other technologies it might be interesting to be able to uninstall it to reduce attack surface. Unfortunately this seems to be not possible (I can’t find it in “Programs and Features” in the list of Windows components) (or at least even Adobe doesn’t know how to do that, because they only tell that their uninstall instruction isn’t for Windows 8 and above).

    Btw. I don’t know who this occured, but on “Patch Tuesday” I was only offered the cumulative November update package and the monthly malware removal tool, but the update for Flash Player was only offered on the next day although it had an KB number on the security bulletin webpage (which let me think that it would have been integrated into the cumulative November update package, which wasn’t the case).

    1. SchoolAdmin says:

      Btw. I don’t know who (should be: how/why) this occured, but on “Patch Tuesday” I was only offered the cumulative November update package and the monthly malware removal tool, but the update for Flash Player was only offered on the next day although it had an KB number on the security bulletin webpage (which let me think that it would have been integrated into the cumulative November update package, which wasn’t the case).

    2. Robert Reid says:

      Win 7. Lol. Pipe down, professor. Upgrade to 10. Do it now. Tired of carrying your Win 7 dead weight.

  3. Keep on top of your cyber security and never ay a thing to these horrible hackers. I have heard some awful stories about this ransomware. I heard one that they attacked a hospital and they had to close because of it. Thats just sick, who does that! It certainly made me think twice about my security update on all my devices thats for sure. I own a business and my next job for this week is to re-think all my online security. The stories that you hear arn’t even worth thinking about, it would cripple me as a business! Better to keep on top of it all.

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