Our Licensing Deal with Samsung: How IP Drives Innovation and Collaboration


Posted by Brad Smith & Horacio Gutierrez
General Counsel & Deputy General Counsel, Microsoft

Today, Microsoft announced a patent cross-licensing agreement with Samsung that will provide coverage under Microsoft’s patent portfolio for Samsung’s mobile phones and tablets. The agreement also gives both companies greater patent coverage relating to each other’s technologies, and opens the door to a deeper partnership in the development of new phones for the Windows Phone platform.

In the context of all the attention intellectual property matters have received in recent months, it’s worth taking a moment to reflect on the meaning and impact of these agreements. The Samsung license agreement marks the seventh agreement Microsoft has signed in the past three months with hardware manufacturers that use Android as an operating system for their smartphones and tablets. The previous six were with Acer, General Dynamics Itronix, Onkyo, Velocity Micro, ViewSonic and Wistron.

Together with the license agreement signed last year with HTC, today’s agreement with Samsung means that the top two Android handset manufacturers in the United States have now acquired licenses to Microsoft’s patent portfolio. These two companies together accounted for more than half of all Android phones sold in the U.S. over the past year. That leaves Motorola Mobility, with which Microsoft is currently in litigation, as the only major Android smartphone manufacturer in the U.S. without a license.

These agreements prove that licensing works. They show what can be achieved when companies sit down and address intellectual property issues in a responsible manner. The rapid growth of the technology industry, and its continued fast pace of innovation are founded on mutual respect for IP. Intellectual property continues to provide the engine that incentivizes research and development, leading to inventions that put new products and services in the hands of millions of consumers and businesses.

We recognize that some businesses and commentators – Google chief among them – have complained about the potential impact of patents on Android and software innovation. To them, we say this: look at today’s announcement. If industry leaders such as Samsung and HTC can enter into these agreements, doesn’t this provide a clear path forward?

Some carriers have called for companies to enter into precisely these types of agreements to address the patent issues that are important to the mobile marketplace. This clearly makes sense. This is how companies have dealt with prior patent issues relating to radio and media technologies for mobile devices. As today’s announcement illustrates, we have now done this for software technologies as well, and we’re committed to entering into similar agreements with other handset manufacturers.

There undoubtedly will be a good deal of additional drama before this new generation of patent issues sorts itself out in its entirety. But as all of our agreements illustrate, a solution is increasingly in sight. Put in this context, today’s announcement does not yet represent the beginning of the end for this industry-wide assortment of issues. But to borrow a well-known phrase, perhaps we’ve now reached the end of the beginning.

Comments (82)

  1. James Katt says:

    Good for Microsoft.

    Microsoft now makes more money from Android than Google makes from Android.

  2. Why innovate when we can sue? says:

    Awesome Microsoft innovation guide:

    (1) File patents for vague and obvious things.

    (2) Threaten/Sue companies

    (3) ???

    (4) Profit!

    I guess it's an admission that WP7 can not compete on merits alone. Great display of bullying, Microsoft.

  3. David Spira says:

    "There undoubtedly will be a good deal of additional drama before this new generation of patent issues sorts itself out in its entirety. But as all of our agreements illustrate, a solution is increasingly in sight. "

    So what you're saying is that everyone is free to innovate so long as they are big enough to afford lawyers who can negotiate with Microsoft's lawyers?

    You're also suggesting that it's beneficial to consumers to allow companies and individuals the ability to patent every little idea they create in the hopes that one day they can leech off of someone else's execution of said idea.

    Congratulations on the licensing agreement.

  4. David Lloyd says:

    So, is the entire reason for the existence of Windows Phone piece of s*** that it generates patents you can use to bully other companies?

  5. Marcus says:

    So fundamentally the company you work for is no better/worse than a crimial organization ?

  6. Edith Roberts says:

    Keep killing innovation and make money out of it.

    Well done Microsoft, well done.

  7. Thom Holwerda says:

    If you can't compete, litigate.

    Such a shame. WP7 is actually a really good product.

  8. Why Innovate When You Can Make Ignorant Comments? says:

    @Why Innovate When we can sue

    Wow, you just perfectly described exactly what Apple is doing right now!

    If you weren't a moron, you'd realize that M$' cross license with Samsung is mutually beneficial, and is positioned to protect Samsung from FURTHER lawsuits from Apple.

    I guess it's an admission that you are ill informed.  Great display of ignorance, Mr. Why Innovate.

  9. Frank says:

    maybe you can tell us what patents Android violates you own, so people can determine on their own if those patents are real innovative ideas or just vague and obvious things.

    'These agreements prove that licensing works'. No, it proves that MS has a lot of IP and knows how to force other companies to pay for them.

    I'm a supporter of patents as long as they get properly used, which I doubt is possible with software patents you probably get paid for because of Android.

    And nice written one-sided hymn of praise pro MS IP.

  10. Some Guy says:

    I bet you're real proud of yourselves for profiting from a platform you had nothing to do with creating.  Everyone knows software patents are a load of bull.

  11. Joe says:

    Greed.  Pure greed.  Microsoft profits from something they had nothing to do with.  When you're as big as Microsoft, I guess you get to make money any way you can.  Let phone manufacturers create and sell hardware, make OS open source and let consumers choose what phones/features/OS they want.  If Microsoft were more benevolent to other businesses, imagine how many partnerships they could generate and how many wonderful products they could create?  

  12. Ben says:

    To add a little contrast to the one-sided Android fanboy hyperbole in here, congratulations to Microsoft and Samsung for coming to an agreement that would benefit both companies and recognising the need to protect intellectual property.

  13. Marcus says:

    @Ben:

    Contrast? Says the Microsoft fan boy ?

  14. Ben says:

    @Marcus So by disagreeing I'm automatically a Microsoft fanboy? It's this sort of black-and-white "pick a side" mentality that prevents well-rounded conversation and constructive debate from taking place.

    Many software patents are overly broad, and the patent trolls of the world that have never shipped a product in their history (ie Lodsys) should not be allowed to sue, particularly small developers. But I recognise the need to protect IP. So do Samsung, who have a strong portfiolio of over 100,000 patents themselves. (And so do Google. Let's see how they'd react to someone copying their patented search algorithm.)

    Neither of us have any knowledge of the patents in question, but you have automatically decided that they lack merit because you're on "Team Android". Yes, that's one-sided bias. Microsoft and other big software companies have been innovating in the software world for 30 years. The market share of WP7 has nothing to do with the legitimacy of the patents, and multi-million dollar companies shouldn't get a free ride just because the operating system itself is licensed for free.

    I don't know if the patents MS are asserting against HTC, Samsung, etc. are obvious or overly broad. But I'm not going to make that decision based on whether MS or Google or Apple or RIM or HP make my mobile OS of choice.

    What I do know is that both Samsung's and HTC's legal battles with Apple demonstrate pretty clearly that they're willing to retaliate and countersue if they believe the patents lack merit. WP7's current lack of market share makes it pretty unlikely that they would be willing to pay royalties on Android in return for a reduction of costs on WP7. Therefore it stands to good reason that they believe that Android is in breach, that licensing these patents is fair and necessary, and likely only negotiated on price.

    (And for the record, I don't own any Windows Mobile devices. My phone is a Samsung Galaxy S II and my tablet an iPad 2.)

  15. l3v1 says:

    "These agreements prove that licensing works."

    No, it does not. It only proves two things. One, signers' side, that it's still easier to pay to Microsoft and make the whole issue go away, than to spend a lot of time and resources in court (even if the other side might win). Two, Microsoft's side, it's still easier to get smaller players pay large piles of cash, than to spend even more resources and effort trying to convince crowds about WP7 and wait for slow profit.

    Nothing more.

  16. Renee Marie Jones says:

    So … you coerce Samsung into paying you protection, then try to make it look like this legitimizes your bogus patent claims?  Just more bullying from Microsoft. You know you can't compete in the marketplace, you have the position you have only because of illegal, coercive agreements with resellers.  The only way you survive is by playing the thug.

  17. KUS says:

    Microsoft was unable to play a significant successfull role in mobile phones in recent years. Acting as a IP owning company only they are at their "beginning of the end" of an software company since nobody will need a operating system soon anymore and have to install Anti virus software on it. The best ecosystem of tablet design, apps portfolio and cloud infrastructure will win – probably without Microsoft engineers at all.

  18. kumar says:

    Its a shame Microsoft is reduced from an Innovator to Patent Troll.

  19. Michael Weinand says:

    Wow I think everyone has a serious misunderstanding of "innovation" and licensing.  It isn't innovating when you use someone else's patented idea without permission (licensing).  If Microsoft really wanted to put on the hurt, they would sue to block these devices from being sold at all (see Apple).  They don't do this because there is no point to make hardware manufacturers angry.  All they are doing is getting the share of the profits that these companies are getting from using Microsoft's technologies.  Obviously they have a pretty good case otherwise all of these manufacturers wouldn't have agreed to these licenses.  If Google was truly innovating and not stealing Microsoft's IP, why wouldn't they provide indemnity for their manufacturers like Microsoft does?  People also tend to forget that Google didn't start Android from scratch, they bought it.  

  20. Francisco Uribe says:

    I'll make sure I do everything I can to avoid buying MS products. This is outrageous.

  21. Brent says:

    @frank

    "maybe you can tell us what patents Android violates you own, so people can determine on their own if those patents are real innovative ideas or just vague and obvious things."

    Why should they? This isn't about what you think; It's a legal matter between corporate entities. The parties involved have seen that data and the majority have decided to enter a licensing agreement after a thorough review by their own considerable legal staffs. End of story.

  22. Mark says:

    Funny how Google, a company who got its VC funding due to a patent, now thinks patents are a bad idea.

  23. John Dorian says:

    I don't see how anyone can still have any amount of respect for Microsoft after this kind of bullsh**. Google created Android, and Microsoft is making more money from it? Is this fair?

    Also, with Bing copying search results.. I will not buy Microsoft products anymore, and anything I receive for free goes straight to the garbage.

  24. Allen says:

    This is like rapists claiming the act was consensual.

    How about you ask Samsung and HTC for statement.

  25. Beamslider says:

    The fact that you will not name the patents you claim are violated proves that you are little more than a patent troll.  Show what was supposedly violated or are you afraid everyone will laugh at ridiculous claims?

  26. Stop! says:

    Dear oh dear, the delusional Google fanboys are in here thick and strong aren't they, specially thick.

    The fact is, Android infringes patents, period. Google is too arrogant to admit that and license the IP, so the hardware manufacturers have to take the licenses instead to protect themselves. End of story.

    And for the record, I own an Android device, which I use for development, a WP7 device and an iOS device and will do so in the future.

    I just don't get this impression that some people have that the sun shines out of Googles ass and it can't do any wrong, because it's complete bull. Open your eyes people and stop being such god damn Google fanboys, you can't see the forest for the trees.

  27. Biilyg says:

    You must be a lawyer rather than somebody that actually produces something.  This is an example of why patents need to be abolished.  This type of extortion racket is destroying innovation.

  28. Joe says:

    To all Google fanboys here:

    Google bought Android! They didn't invent Android!

    Google bought Android! They didn't invent Android!

    Android copied Java code from Sun!

    Android copied Java code from Sun!

    Enough said. Anodrid == crap.

  29. MS is nothing more than an uncompetitive patent troll says:

    Windows Phone can't compete, so Microsoft patent trolls with bogus patent claims. Nothing new there, standard modus operandi for big bullies that will be driven out of the market soon by Apple, another big bully patent troll.

  30. Major Plonquer says:

    I think today I'll make a search engine.  It will work just like Google but I will give it away instead of charging money.  Google will obviously give me all the support I need and won't stifle inovation by suing me.  What do you think?

  31. Ashamed says:

    I WAS a proud windows-platform developer for more that 12 years. I'm ashamed for that. You, Microsoft, already lost a lot. I hope you to loose what's left. I'll certenly do my part on that.

  32. ML49448 says:

    I really don't think you get it. Android draws a lot of open source fans, patent trolling will just cause them to not buy devices that deal with you. Patent trolling does not help innovation, it hinders it.

  33. Metin says:

    I think microsoft should stop development at this point. They will make a lot of money from this at no cost. Well done!

  34. Raven says:

    evil beware

  35. Victor Soliz says:

    Thank you Microsoft, for all the innovation! Thanks to you, if I wanted to buy a Samsung phone, I will be paying more money. And the money will go to Microsoft, whom will be using the money to keep spanning more and more "licensing deals" so that in the future, phones will cost me more money. Meanwhile, competition will continue to get harder, and with less competition, I will also have to pay up more.

    Thank you for not ever specifying what the "patents" that other people violate are. And instead prefer to make secret deals with companies that eventually end up dead out of a coincidence.  Happened to Novell, will happen to Nokia and I guess we can tell that it will happen to Samsung.

    I also thank you for the great innovation in the courts. All while google is busy trying to deal in congress against an anti-trust lawsuit. You have been using all your bullying skills to make Samsung kill itself. Once again, Microsoft have shown us where they put all their innovation skills: In lawyers and in creating legal issues for others and not in software.

    Thank you also for demonstrating that not even you believe in windows phone.

  36. Victor Soliz says:

    @Major Plonquer .You would be so clever if it wasn't for the fact that search engines such as bing already exist and google is not suing them…

  37. Victor Soliz says:

    @Ben: "Benefit both companies". Historically these deals never benefit both companies. Look up what happened to Novell for more information.

    "Protect IP" is such an ambiguous claim. What IP are we talking about? Android doesn't have MS' code nor does it violate copyright. It does not make a lot of sense for MS to receive money for code they didn't make.

    The thing is, that had software patents existed back in Billy Gates' days, Microsoft would not have happened. Every Microsoft fan should be scared about these trends. Specifically, Microsoft investing more on lawyers than in producing good, relevant software.

    At the end of the day, we, consumers lose. The big corps will be fine paying themselves all royalties and extorsion licenses. As for us, we'll be paying more and more money for what? Innovation? Nah, paying for licensing patents for trivial software. Yay for us!

  38. Victor Soliz says:

    "These two companies together accounted for more than half of all Android phones sold in the U.S. over the past year. That leaves Motorola Mobility, with which Microsoft is currently in litigation, as the only major Android smartphone manufacturer in the U.S. without a license.

    These agreements prove that licensing works. They show what can be achieved when companies sit down and address intellectual property issues in a responsible manner."

    Au contraire my friend. This highlights that carriers and manufacturers are way too vulnerable to legal bullying. If google didn't have an argument before, this racketing will give them one.

  39. John says:

    microsoft CAN compete, you complaining losers obviously havent use wp7

    enjoy your android malware, fragmentation, and not getting updates this decade

  40. John says:

    microsoft CAN compete, you complaining losers obviously havent use wp7

    enjoy your android malware, fragmentation, and not getting updates this decade

  41. God says:

    Microsoft is a pathetic company, stealing money from products they wish they had developed. Microsoft hasn't innovated anything their own ever! Windows 1.1 was a Mac OS copy for god's sake!!

  42. JC Blachere says:

    28 September, Microsoft announced its firm commitment to stifling innovation and competition so that it can continue to dominate and profit.  And the rest of the world is supposed to rejoice in the continuation of a proven business model since the MS-dos days.

  43. Competition is a game says:

    And everyone is playing the same game. Look at the history.

  44. Trond Hill says:

    "We recognize that some businesses and commentators – Google chief among them – have complained about the potential impact of patents on Android and software innovation. To them, we say this: look at today’s announcement. If industry leaders such as Samsung and HTC can enter into these agreements, doesn’t this provide a clear path forward?"

    Show us why they have entered this deal and we can answer this question. As of now it's all speculations and so we can only guess why:

    * If you do not sign this agreement we'll do this… and this … and this …

    Transparency guys, transparency

  45. drom says:

    Shame on MS !

  46. trolling or slapping says:

    The only thing better than patent trolling around is to go and slap the monkey! Wahhh!

    http://www.suvi.org/…/slapit.html

  47. John says:

    I think its fair, that everybody who produces tech for the US

    Marketplace "pays" Apple, Microsoft and some other bodies an

    "we probably thought about it before corporation tax".

    I can only hope for one thing: that a smart phone for $200 is $500

    in three years, because every single IP holder wants its share.

    Every $0,99 app costs $7,99 because every body needs to milk

    their IP-backlog. Thats the only way the market and society "learns".

    Microsoft, I thank you for showing an entire industry, how to limit

    choice and remove the need to innovate. Why should you? Riding on

    other successes is so much easier and less job-intensive. Good job!

  48. crisr says:

    bad, bad!

  49. mike says:

    Pay For Android ??? I don't think so, it is just FUD

    Android is free, if MS have any issue with patents for Linux or Android thay sould sue Google or Linux, otherwise we don't now what patent company pay for 🙂

    see:http://www.zdnet.com/…/9634

  50. stig says:

    Well, I deeply think that you, with help of apple and oracle, are going to win… You're going to kill Android.

    It will be a great success for your industry. However, it will be an immense shame for us, simple user. I like android, I'm sorry it violate patents but today it is the system that fulfills perfectly my needs. I also like having the choice between an obvious system like iOS, a coherent one like android, and an innovative one like 7mobile.

    Tomorrow I'm sure google will be fed up with all these troubles and  will give up on android. It will be the logical thing to do as a company that can't keep wasting money. But for us, for me, it will be the loss of one of the best available smartphone system.

    Keep going you are legally perfectly right to do so, but no matter you want it or not, no matter you are responsible or not, You are killing something that is useful to a lot of people.

    IP protection is a good thing, patenting everything is not.

  51. Anomymous says:

    LADRÕES

  52. MICROSOFT GUYS MAFIA says:

    EXTORTION!!!!

  53. The Oracle says:

    An excellent indicator for why Microsoft is going down over time. They should shut down R&D completely and replace all of them with lawyers.

  54. George says:

    Congratulations…

    It seems that you finally realized that is much easier to make money from your competitors then from releasing new and innovator products, if by any means you had a product that fitted such description. It's just like buying and reselling DOS to IBM. Get someone else work and make profit on it. You should work on Wall Street. That's the real nature of your company.

    You are not IT Business, you are great resellers. Why can't you just accept it and move on?

  55. i8ms says:

    Microsoft, you disgust me! I curse the day you were born and spit on your crappy products!!!

  56. Kwanbis says:

    You gotta be kidding right? "How IP Drives Innovation and Collaboration"?

  57. Really? says:

    Microsoft sang a very different tune in 1991. In a memo to his senior executives, Bill Gates wrote, “If people had understood how patents would be granted when most of today’s ideas were invented, and had taken out patents, the industry would be at a complete standstill today.” Mr. Gates worried that “some large company will patent some obvious thing” and use the patent to “take as much of our profits as they want.”

    Mr. Gates wrote his 1991 memo shortly after the courts began allowing patents on software in the 1980s. At the time Microsoft was a growing company challenging entrenched incumbents like I.B.M. and Novell. It had only eight patents to its name. Recognizing the threat to his company, Mr. Gates initiated an aggressive patenting program. Today Microsoft holds more than 6,000 patents.

    It’s not surprising that Microsoft — now an entrenched incumbent — has had a change of heart. But Mr. Gates was right in 1991: patents are bad for the software industry.

  58. James Brown says:

    Too all MS fanboys citing IP, patent and other legal stuff: Do you realize that such thing can be done only in US (Australia, Japan, …, ?). US patent system is bad. Period. Google violates bad law. This law should be reformed. Big companies like MS like it cause they make huge money from it (see the blog post).

  59. Sam S says:

    Microsoft = Android patent troll

  60. Michael A says:

    Well, there is always bad karma for everyone. It will come and Microsoft will have it's share of that. It's purely greed

  61. Which Microsoft patents does Android allegedly infringe?

  62. francisco says:

    Is good to see Microsoft making money from Android, because it has been a complete failure trying to compete with its half-baked microsoft mobile os (whatever its name is this week). But this is not surprising: the only arena where Microsoft has been able to establish a monopoly (and a cartel) is in the PC market (with US government complicity). Thank God there is still competition in the mobile OS market.

  63. Realist says:

    Shame on all'O'you Microsoft Haters!

    I know y'all won't say anything if it happens you work with Microsoft Corporation or if you're related to Bill Gate.U probably be more than happy by now.

    Don't you get it?….Business is Competition and Patent/Litigation is one of its tools.

    May be other Corporations should get a better Legal/Patent advisers,So that other Corporations won't run them over…

    Can't you see the world itself is a Competition…Countries taking on other Countries,Religions taking on Religions.

    We've to be realistic here…when you go into Business,you need to compete with every tools at your disposal(so far it's acceptable)…afterall,Microsoft is not the "Trust" issuing the Patents to herself.

    My advice is, all'o'y'all should be pro-active,take every opportunity to make your money acceptably,so that buying a Windows or Android won't be an ache to you.

    The World itself ain't fair….an Hate till tomorrow won't bring Microsoft down.She uses her Brain…U can do the same.

  64. kev williams says:

    The only thing MS is actually gaining from all this litigation is a lot of bad press. They are shooting themselves in both feet and re enforces that fact that they are corporate bullies. I for one will never buy a microsoft device from any supplier. They lost the web and they are losing mobile. Does anybody know anybody who uses a mobile device powered from Microsoft ?

  65. Thomas Williams says:

    Innovation and Collaboration…what a joke. They don't get it. Last month I was looking for a new car. I went to try a Ford Taurus. Naturally I brought my two teens and my wife to check the seating and confort. While I was test driving the car, my fifteen year old son asked from the back seat, "Dad, why would buy a car that has Microsoft Stuff in  it", referring to the Microsoft Sync logo. I replied, "You are right, I won't because it is lousy products and they are bad corporate citizens". I ended up buying a honda Accord. The next is about Apple, Google, BlackBerries and Social Networks: No Where land for Microsoft.

  66. G_A says:

    Which Microsoft patents does Android allegedly infringe?

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  70. Carlos Santos says:

    Hey while you are at it why not sue browser brands too, they do browse like your Internet Explorer crap.

    Intellectual property is all bull, I mean we are more then a billion people in the world, do you really think you're entitled to anything? Companies/People develop apps and put them into market free of charge, allow or not the disclosure of source code, then you go over that. Uhmmm good idea here lets buy the code to the poor guy…oh wait now it makes no sense the code to be free…guess what dumb asses the code was already out before you had it, so who ever used previous code is free to continue using it, develop/enhance do what ever they want with it, because the author (not you) let them do it!!!

    Shut up and let the world alone!!

  71. Henri says:

    from all the comments.. only the one here below made sense, it is actually to be protected from Apple that they pay Microsoft.

    @Marcus So by disagreeing I'm automatically a Microsoft fanboy? It's this sort of black-and-white "pick a side" mentality that prevents well-rounded conversation and constructive debate from taking place.

    Many software patents are overly broad, and the patent trolls of the world that have never shipped a product in their history (ie Lodsys) should not be allowed to sue, particularly small developers. But I recognise the need to protect IP. So do Samsung, who have a strong portfiolio of over 100,000 patents themselves. (And so do Google. Let's see how they'd react to someone copying their patented search algorithm.)

    Neither of us have any knowledge of the patents in question, but you have automatically decided that they lack merit because you're on "Team Android". Yes, that's one-sided bias. Microsoft and other big software companies have been innovating in the software world for 30 years. The market share of WP7 has nothing to do with the legitimacy of the patents, and multi-million dollar companies shouldn't get a free ride just because the operating system itself is licensed for free.

    I don't know if the patents MS are asserting against HTC, Samsung, etc. are obvious or overly broad. But I'm not going to make that decision based on whether MS or Google or Apple or RIM or HP make my mobile OS of choice.

    What I do know is that both Samsung's and HTC's legal battles with Apple demonstrate pretty clearly that they're willing to retaliate and countersue if they believe the patents lack merit. WP7's current lack of market share makes it pretty unlikely that they would be willing to pay royalties on Android in return for a reduction of costs on WP7. Therefore it stands to good reason that they believe that Android is in breach, that licensing these patents is fair and necessary, and likely only negotiated on price.

    (And for the record, I don't own any Windows Mobile devices. My phone is a Samsung Galaxy S II and my tablet an iPad 2.)

  72. Moises says:

    "Thom Holwerda 28 Sep 2011 8:20 AM #

    If you can't compete, litigate.

    Such a shame. WP7 is actually a really good product."

    or if you can't compete just still another companies ideas/patents, get rich, and when they come after you, just say, they can't compete, but are willing to litigate. Some people are just to stupid for themselves, these are the people who like to buy stolen goods for dirt cheap. Sorta like receiving stolen property, and then claiming it's ok because you bought it.

  73. Dassie M. says:

    Microsoft FUD at work. Shocking that some people/companies fall for that. (Written on a PC with Ubuntu – take that, Mister Ballmer.)

  74. Tjerk says:

    Please tell us which patents this is about! Then i can make a decision wjether Microsoft is right.

  75. Marketing and Web says:

    FOSS is true in many applications have evolved a lot and has a great future. The payment software, however have to adapt to changing marketplace

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    http://www.marketingandweb.es/

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