Adding our Voice to Concerns about Search in Europe


Posted by Brad Smith
Senior Vice President & General Counsel, Microsoft Corporation

Microsoft is filing a formal complaint with the European Commission as part of the Commission’s ongoing investigation into whether Google has violated European competition law.  We thought it important to be transparent and provide some information on what we’re doing and why.

At the outset, we should be among the first to compliment Google for its genuine innovations, of which there have been many over the past decade.  As the only viable search competitor to Google in the U.S. and much of Europe, we respect their engineering prowess and competitive drive.  Google has done much to advance its laudable mission to “organize the world’s information,” but we’re concerned by a broadening pattern of conduct aimed at stopping anyone else from creating a competitive alternative.

We’ve therefore decided to join a large and growing number of companies registering their concerns about the European search market.  By the European Commission’s own reckoning, Google has about 95 percent of the search market in Europe.  This contrasts with the United States, where Microsoft serves about a quarter of Americans’ search needs either directly through Bing or through our partnership with Yahoo!. 

At Microsoft we’ve shown that we’re prepared to work hard and invest literally billions of dollars annually to offer Bing, a search service that many now regard as the most innovative available.  But, hard work and innovation need a fair and competitive marketplace in which to thrive, and twice the Department of Justice has intervened to thwart Google’s unlawful conduct from impeding fair competition.  In 2008 the DOJ moved to file suit against Google for its unlawful attempt to tie up and set search advertising prices at Yahoo!, causing Google to back down.  And last year the DOJ formally objected to Google’s efforts to monopolize book content, a position affirmed by a federal district court in New York just last week.  Unfortunately, even this has not stopped the spread by Google of new and disconcerting practices in the United States.

As troubling as the situation is in United States, it is worse in Europe.  That is why our filing today focuses on a pattern of actions that Google has taken to entrench its dominance in the markets for online search and search advertising to the detriment of European consumers. 

How does it do this?  Google has built its business on indexing and displaying snippets of other organizations’ Web content.  It understands as well as anyone that search engines depend upon the openness of the Web in order to function properly, and it’s quick to complain when others undermine this.  Unfortunately, Google has engaged in a broadening pattern of walling off access to content and data that competitors need to provide search results to consumers and to attract advertisers. 

On PCs it is usually not difficult for people to navigate to any search engine.  Google in fact makes this point virtually every time someone raises antitrust concerns about their practices.  Their defense ignores the hugely important fact that there are many other important ways that search services compete.  Search engines compete to index the Web as fully as possible so they can generate good search results, they compete to gain advertisers (the source of revenue in this business), and they compete to gain distribution of their search boxes through Web sites.  Consumers will not benefit from clicking to alternative sites unless all search engines have a fair opportunity to compete in each of these areas. 

Our filing details many instances where Google is impeding competition in these areas.  A half-dozen examples below help illustrate some of our concerns. 

First, in 2006 Google acquired YouTube—and since then it has put in place a growing number of technical measures to restrict competing search engines from properly accessing it for their search results.  Without proper access to YouTube, Bing and other search engines cannot stand with Google on an equal footing in returning search results with links to YouTube videos and that, of course, drives more users away from competitors and to Google.

Second, in 2010 and again more recently, Google blocked Microsoft’s new Windows Phones from operating properly with YouTube. Google has enabled its own Android phones to access YouTube so that users can search for video categories, find favorites, see ratings, and so forth in the rich user interfaces offered by those phones.  It’s done the same thing for the iPhones offered by Apple, which doesn’t offer a competing search service. 

Unfortunately, Google has refused to allow Microsoft’s new Windows Phones to access this YouTube metadata in the same way that Android phones and iPhones do.  As a result, Microsoft’s YouTube “app” on Windows Phones is basically just a browser displaying YouTube’s mobile Web site, without the rich functionality offered on competing phones.  Microsoft is ready to release a high quality YouTube app for Windows Phone.  We just need permission to access YouTube in the way that other phones already do, permission Google has refused to provide.

Third, Google is seeking to block access to content owned by book publishers.  This was underscored in federal court in New York last week, in the decision involving Google’s effort to obtain exclusive and unfettered access to the large volume of so-called “orphan books”—books for which no copyright holder can readily be found.  Under Google’s plan only its search engine would be able to return search results from these books.  As the federal court said in rejecting this plan, “Google’s ability to deny competitors the ability to search orphan books would further entrench Google’s market power in the online search market.”  This is an important initial step under U.S. law, but it needs to be reinforced by similar positions in Europe and the rest of the world.

Fourth, Google is even restricting its customers’—namely, advertisers’—access to their own data.  Advertisers input large amounts of data into Google’s ad servers in the course of managing their advertising campaigns.  This data belongs to the advertisers:  it reflects their decisions about their own business.  But Google contractually prohibits advertisers from using their data in an interoperable way with other search advertising platforms, such as Microsoft’s adCenter. 

This makes it much more costly for Google’s advertisers to run portions of their campaigns with any competitor, and thus less likely that they will do so.  That is a significant problem because most advertisers figure that they have to advertise first with Google.  If it’s too expensive to port their advertising campaign data to competing advertising platforms, many won’t do it.  Competing search engines are left with less relevant ads, and less revenue.  And while this restraint isn’t visible to consumers, its effects are nonetheless felt across the Web.  Advertising revenue is the economic propellant fueling the billions of dollars needed for ongoing search investments.  By reducing competitors’ ability to attract advertising revenue, this restriction strikes at the heart of a competitive market.

Fifth, this undermining of competition is reflected in concerns that go beyond Google’s control over content.  One of the ways that search engines attract users is through distribution of search boxes through Web sites.  Unfortunately, Google contractually blocks leading Web sites in Europe from distributing competing search boxes.  It is obviously difficult for competing search engines to gain users when nearly every search box is powered by Google.  Google’s exclusivity terms have even blocked Microsoft from distributing its Windows Live services, such as email and online document storage, through European telecommunications companies because these services are monetized through Bing search boxes.

Finally, we share the concerns expressed by many others that Google discriminates against would-be competitors by making it more costly for them to attain prominent placement for their advertisements.  Microsoft has provided the Commission with a considerable body of expert analysis concerning how search engine algorithms work and the competitive significance of promoting or demoting various advertisements. 

Over the past year, a growing number of advertisers, publishers, and consumers have expressed to us their concerns about the search market in Europe.  They’ve urged us to share our knowledge of the search market with competition officials.  As they’ve pointed out, the stakes are high for the European economy.  On any given day, more than half of all Europeans use the Internet, and more than 90 percent of them look for information about goods and services on the Web.  Indeed, the European Commission’s Digital Agenda made clear that commerce is moving online, where two-thirds of Europeans begin their shopping process.  It’s therefore critical that search engines and online advertising move forward in an open, fair and competitive manner. 

There of course will be some who will point out the irony in today’s filing.  Having spent more than a decade wearing the shoe on the other foot with the European Commission, the filing of a formal antitrust complaint is not something we take lightly.  This is the first time Microsoft Corporation has ever taken this step.  More so than most, we recognize the importance of ensuring that competition laws remain balanced and that technology innovation moves forward. 

We readily appreciate that Google should continue to have the freedom to innovate.  But it shouldn’t be permitted to pursue practices that restrict others from innovating and offering competitive alternatives.  That’s what it’s doing now.  And that’s what we hope European officials will assess and ultimately decide to stop.

Comments (136)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Take msdn forum as an example, Microsoft terrible bing engine perform badly. I need to use Google and add "msdn" into keyword to perform the search. Don't cry that Google block your engine. You engine just like a toy.

  2. Anonymous says:

    While some may see it odd that the gripe is placed by Microsoft, I also support the gripe. For long, Google has been the default search engine everywhere. It's the ONLY search engine available on Apple's iP* devices (iPhone, iPad); it's the first search en Safari, Firefox, Opera, Camino, and other browsers. Google often has a cavalier attitude toward user support: another service is "just a click away". (I.e., "like it or lump it.") And Google invested heavily in both Apple and Mozilla corporations for these priveleges. (For the latter, Mozilla ran the risk of losing its not-for-profit status and thus had to split into two parts: Mozilla.com for making money and Mozilla.org for not-for-profit code-writing and distribution) This heavy Google monopolization should be addressed.

  3. Peter Schmidt (Germany) says:

    Why do we pay for the same Google Ad the price in Euro (Europe) and the others the price in US Dollar? Thats much cheaper!!!

  4. Iñigo Alonso Fernández says:

    The pot calling the kettle black 😉

  5. Cory Nelson says:

    Why are there high quality YouTube apps in the WP7 marketplace?  Are they breaking Google's rules?

  6. Denis says:

    if US government had any backbone, Microsoft would of been split in two for abusing its dominant market position with Windows

  7. Dan B says:

    I, for one, support this action wholeheartedly! Ironic… perhaps? Necessary… for sure! Good luck to MS et al, in this action!

  8. Julian says:

    The reason we use Google isn't because of the fact it has the ability to "search youtube" or whatever is being suggested in this. It's due to the fact that Bing is a pile of crap, have you seen the design. And I for one am fed up of it being the default search provider on IE, as this is something I cannot change on machines at university.

    Often I type a search in, realise it's gone to Bing, then search for google, go to google, and then continue. I think it'd be interesting to find a figure about how many people do this.

  9. Andy Morris says:

    This just sounds like MS is throwing all their toys out of their pram because Google's search engine is better than Bing… Sure, that's a real mature attitude.

    What's next? Are they going to file against Mozilla and Opera for making superior web browsers too?

  10. Luis says:

    Digámoslo claro: Google es mucho mejor que Bing. Por tanto, la culpa no es de Google, sino de los usuarios que deciden utilizar Google como buscador por ser mejor.

    Vaya caradura más grande.

  11. Ade says:

    Is this meant to be an April Fools Joke?

  12. Kuntal says:

    I support MS for this move. Hopefully European commission will take tough action as they did against MS earlier :).

    Bing is a good search engine for US. Though it does not provide very relevant content for other part of the world. Also it still needs some improvement in area of design and usability. May be they can take some queue for Metro design of WP7.

  13. P says:

    Haha this is a bit rich coming from MS and their past history.

    It's called Karma.

  14. Mikey says:

    The reason we all use Google is it's fast to search things. Bing has stupid backgrounds, and the design is crap. look at state of it just dose not look right from somthing from Microsoft.

    Google has the wow factor when you use any of there services. My tip is for you is stay with making Windows.

  15. Matt Dyson says:

    To ba fair, IE 9 is pretty good. Bing is a work in progress, its no way near as good as google yet but for web searches but for images i think it has the upper hand.

    @Julian: i would have to agree, i think this statistic would be fairly substantial. however it is interesteing that google are still loosing 1% market share month on month. In a few years this situation might get quite interesting…

  16. David Johnson says:

    Google has been acting in a predatory manner for quite some time. Their AdWords platform lacks any transparency. I have run advertising campaigns with AdWords constantly for the last 8 years. The ad-ranking and the costings can literally do a small company out of business. They state that advertising pricing is measured with it's relevance, but yet it suggests keywords which then increase in cost exponentially even though they exceed their own click through standards because according to Google they do not meet their "quality standards". What are these "standards"? Well they are a black box of nothingness that is literally in place to jack up the cost to advertisers. It does not matter what the Click Through Rate is or how Relevant the term is, they constantly go up. Back a few years ago Google was not this way at all. We had great success in terms of traffic quality and reasonable costs. That has all changed in the last few (4 or so) years. That said, what do small businesses do? As a small business owner I am often appalled by the traffic that Google is more than happy to charge to our account. We lodge a complaint and they reimburse which in my opinion is a clear admission of guilt. That said if we were not vigilant their their poor quality and sometimes clearly fraudulent traffic would cost us significantly. We do not "have" to use their service, but if we do not then the little quality traffic we receive would not arrive and we would no longer be viable. It sometimes feels like modern day extortion. As much as we would like to use Bing or Yahoo their market share is too limited to have any impact. With Google unfortunately we are damned if we do, and damned if we don't.

  17. Anon says:

    You and your company are so full of it.

  18. Larry says:

    Not a compelling case.  How far has MS fallen, and how ironic this is.  It illustrates that MS has no long term future in OS or applications.  They realize they need cloud and search and are desperate to establish a foothold.  Not a rosy outlook.

  19. Johnathan Archer (from the Starship Enterprise) says:

    I've just been linked this on an IRC channel and I have to say:

    Kudos, that's the best laugh I've had in over a year!

  20. Rick says:

    microsoft lost the search war, just like yahoo and aol and alta vista and… they lost it when it was msn and live and whatever else you've called it. people chose google.

    the only difference is you have the cash cows. you won't go home. as ballmer said, ms may not be first or best but they just keep coming and coming and coming.

    translation: they'll pump money into it until the "competition" dies. oh sure, it's "competition" but it's not fair competition. we call that cheating. law suits have shown that "fair" competition is important.

    where i come from you lose you take it, you don't go home and get your big brother and his friends to do your fighting for you. you bully with the cash cow twins and we're supposed to care?

    you bundle it with windows and people still chose google.  hail, your entire msn, search, online presence has never made money right? you've lost enough to build another international space station. and we're supposed to care?

  21. Patrick (Netherlands) says:

    As much as Windows leaves a bad taste in my mouth (I only use Macs) and I dislike Microsoft (I worked in the past for a company which was basically crushed by them) I believe in the phrase "those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" George Santayana.

    Google is clearly not the innocent 'poster child' of the Internet age, nor are they a ‘good fairy’ distributing goodies freely to the world. They are a ‘for profit’ company which is greedy and rapacious in pursuing their goal of maintaining and building their profit – to the detriment of other companies and individuals.

    They well and truly need to be brought to heel (and saying thus does not mean I love Microsoft).

  22. Bill Gates says:

    Google: Bing Is Cheating, Copying Our Search Results

    Google has run a sting operation that it says proves Bing has been watching what people search for on Google, the sites they select from Google’s results, then uses that information to improve Bing’s own search listings. Bing doesn’t deny this.

    Bing doesn’t deny Google’s claim. Indeed, the statement that Stefan Weitz, director of Microsoft’s Bing search engine.

    As you might imagine, we use multiple signals and approaches when we think about ranking, but like the rest of the players in this industry, we’re not going to go deep and detailed in how we do it. Clearly, the overarching goal is to do a better job determining the intent of the search, so we can guess at the best and most relevant answer to a given query.

    When Bing launched in 2009, the joke was that Bing stood for either “Because It’s Not Google” or “But It’s Not Google.” Mining Google’s searches makes me wonder if the

    joke should change to “Bing Is Now Google.”

  23. Matt Dyson says:

    Rick: would you like Google to be the only search engine?

    You dont honestly think that would be good for the internet do you?

  24. true says:

    You (MS) should sue yourself for stealing idea of GoogleMaps and putting it into BingMaps. Your Windows Phones are crap. YT have changed video streaming – everyone else can upgrade the software including such free projects as Minitube.

    This is a proove that You lost the steam to develop – maybe it's time to fire lawyers and hire programmers.

    What about this:

    googleblog.blogspot.com/…/microsofts-bing-uses-google-search.html

    sue yourself.

  25. @true says:

    Bing doesn't copy google's results. That's FUD that google has been feeding the fanboys to make MS look bad.

    I though agree that Bing's non US sites needs some work.

  26. OTP says:

    Hypocrites. Like any other 800 pound gorilla that got the *** kicked out of it by the new kid on the block. Just like RSA in authentication spaces ripping on the new kids when the new kids are the best.

  27. Jonny B says:

    I feel 100% thankful for this move! I am a SMB owner in germany, we are offering search portals like business directories and blog search.

    I feared the already ongoing investigation of the EU would not succeed as the companies that filed claims so far are not really those kind of companies that google would take serious. MS however is a whole different breed and this will force both EU and google to look at it more detailed as they would do anyway.

    In your post however, you understandably look at google only from your own point of view. In my opinion, you leave out one very important issue, being transparency of their ranking.

    As you already pointed out, googles dominance in the EU is comparable to a monopoly. Google never leaves out any possibility to tell that the people themselves chose for google, that their service is for free and that nobody therefore can claim any rights. Based on that view, google preserves their intransparency of ranking and penalties. They have closed up themselves leaving no contact possibilities for customers and webmasters, providing only some useless predefined forms in case of valid complaints and a support forum in which sometimes some google employees might(!) give answer. Using the latter also means one have to go public with any problem you might have.

    Nobody ever seems to think about the fact that the power given to google by the crowd by using their search services should in turn bring some responsabilities for google. Compare it to politicians: one might have been chosen into senate, but that does not mean a senator has no responsibilities towards the public. A senator cannot claim he is offering himself for free so he can act as he wants, does he?

    There is imo a lack of laws regarding this issue.

    Google is (in the EU) an entrance to the market for almost all companies working online. It is an essential role of a search engine nowadays to bring buyers to the offers available. In a free and competing market, ideally every company should have the same chance to present their offers to this market. The current laws available make sure that this is the case for the "offline" market, by providing rules about legitimate competition.

    The online situation however nowadays is different. google is the door to the online market, but they rule it like a dictator. If google chooses to downrank a site or even give a penalty, it does so without a need to give a reason, leaving the owner of that site only with a general hint towards their general quality guidelines.

    In the offline world, a comparable penalty can only given by a court, leaving the owner of a business with a broad range of legal possibilities to complain against that ruling. Google offers NO way to complain, there is NO possibility to contact them about anything.

    Lawmakers should really be pointed to the fact that this is not only highly unfair, it is also not the intent our lawmakers want our market to be like. There MUST be a way to file a complaint against such sometimes devastating actions of google. They MUST take these complaints serious and MUST be transparent towards siteowners on actions taken against their website.

    Another point is how google makes sure their employees are not gaming their own system for some extra bucks.

    I personally know that some of the "quality raters" google uses are close friends to SEO guys, and that there is money paid to these raters for "favors". So far, google has no policies to prevent that.

    As i have attended some of the seo events around here, one can easily notice that google representatives share the same stage with seos known for their linkselling and blackhat techniques. For me, this has a nasty taste. How can google give penalties for less to wellknown sites and at the same time team up with such guys that even on that same stage claim that one cannot rank without buying links. Even if it was cooincidence (which it is not as the same guys are on almost every event), shouldnt google prevent such neighborhood?

  28. Stefan Rosander says:

    Coming from the right mouth! Microsoft has abused European customer for so many years and now as they are loosing the mobile battle, they go after Google. Pathetic!

  29. Bender says:

    Failed to attack by proxy so now you must attack directly? Don't you ever get tired? I recommend firing all your PR and hire programmers instead.

  30. Rosario says:

    It's sad what has happened to MS. Just pathetic.

  31. Lawyer Joe says:

    If you can't beat 'em, sue 'em! That's what I say!

    Lawyer Joe – 1-800-SUE-NOW1. I also do injury cases too.

  32. Rain Day says:

    Dear Microsoft, it's a difficult thing for you to accept, I know, but even if your goal is to sue all your competition into oblivion, many of your ex-customers still wouldn't buy or use your products again. Not even if you filled it with chocolate and dipped it in gold.

    If you think law suits (laced with FUD and 'poor-me' whining) is the best way to force people into using your products and services again, you've already lost the battle…though your lawyers will love you.

    Seriously, just stop thinking you are the Center of the Universe and try to actually create something better, not just buy PR to make it *look* better, but really better. At this point, with so much trust lost already, it might take years (decades?) for you to gain acceptance again, but it will never happen if you don't stop being jerks.

    Just sayin'…  

  33. vince ma lou says:

    Buenos dias.

    No tenéis vergüenza alguna. Lo que deberías haber hecho, es aprovechar

    Vuestra posición en el pasado para trabajar más y mejor.

    Os están pasando por delante a base de buenas ideas.

    Don de está vuestro SO para tablets. W7 mobile…? Jaja.

    Mas trabajar y menos joder a los demás. A este ritmo que

    Llevais dentro de poco nadie usara Windows.

    Aún estáis a tiempo de que no deje de usar w7.

    Adios. Un cordial saludo.

  34. Kit says:

    Adwords opacity may be frustrating, but it helps protect 'the little guy' from the huge spam companies who would be able to use that data far more effectively to manipulate themselves ahead.

    Anyways, if Bing wants YouTube in their results, clearly they just have to set the 'Copy from Google' to high. (Does anyone out there actually use google to search youtube? I always go to youtube to search youtube.) Sure, Bing steals content slower than Google indexes it, but nothing is stopping Microsoft from hiring more programing staff for Bing instead of paying for a lawsuit.

    Don't get me wrong; I was a die-hard Yahoo! fan up until a few years ago. I use Google because they get it right. If Yahoo! had kept up, I'd still be over there. If Bing worked better than Google, I'd be on Bing.

    As far as aps go, I'm confused as to why Microsoft sees a need to develop an ap that absorbs another company's content. Youtube is a website. One views websites via a web browser. If google wants to make a youtube ap, sure, that's fine. It's their site. That makes sense. Some companies charge for their aps. Imagine if you were Site A, and made an ap that you charged for and MS came along and made a free version. I'm thinking that wouldn't go over well. So why should MS be able to do the same thing just because Google's youtube ap is free?

  35. Adrian says:

    Has anyone noticed that Microsoft Online Services doesn't work properly on Google Chrome? I just signed up to evaluate Exchange and can't create new users when using Chrome. It works with IE.

  36. Filip says:

    Hahahahaha!!!!

    Thanks for the laugh. You have made my day.

    Would you please first fix your own anti cimpetitive bahviour before whining at others?

  37. Filip says:

    Hahahahaha!!!!

    Thanks for the laugh. You have made my day.

    Would you please first fix your own anti cimpetitive bahviour before whining at others?

  38. John John says:

    Are you high? people are laughing at Microsoft with your comments.

  39. Jose says:

    Does Google get more people than Bing? Of course! But What I think Microsoft's point is that Bing does better because MSFT throws billions of dollars into it. They say it should be better because Google restricts a lot of the things that it is able to do. Yeah, maybe this is Karma, and maybe Microsoft deserves it, but if I'm advertising and I can't afford to advertise on both major search engines because the bigger one makes me do extra work to get on the other one, that's kinda taking it too far….

  40. true says:

    "Bing doesn't copy google's results. That's FUD that google has been feeding the fanboys to make MS look bad."

    Supposedly most peoples here can't understand technical side of what Google have shown in that experiment – but easy, there are IT specialists who can.

    Non-professionals however may wonder why MS haven't sued Google for this FUD – …because it's true?

    For sure it's not just copying – it's very close to spyware integrated into operating system… oh, but You may call it "feature" that allows to inform Bing about what Windows users preferences, choices etc are.

    Sony was less lucky:

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Sony_BMG_copy_protection_rootkit_scandal

    … but they haven't possibility to integrate the rootkit so deeply – they don't have Windows source code (at least officially).

    Jonny B:

    "Nobody ever seems to think about the fact that the power given to google by the crowd by using their search services should in turn bring some responsabilities for google."

    If you worry so much about Google monopoly then what do you say about MS monopoly in operating systems? MS monopoly is ok, Google monopoly is bad – childish.

    Google is sponsoring many projects, gives tons of software for free and have LARGE shares in Open Source/Free Software development – that's painfull for You – isn't it?

    Well, I prefer Google monopoly over Yours – and it looks like I'm not alone.

  41. Dan James says:

    I can't understand how dumb some of the people here are. Your all going on about how its karma etc etc, microsoft have broken fair competitor laws several times, and have paid the largest fines ever issued to a company for this.

    Some are saying "youtube is google's site, its up to them who they let use it". This is not the case, Windows is Microsofts OS, but they cant stop other companies installing software on it. What do you think Google would do if one day Chrome stopped working on Windows, and the response from Microsoft was "well its our OS and you cant use it". If this was the case, Google would have been dead and buried years ago, as Microsoft could just ban people from going on Google.

    Google's practices are just as bad as anything Microsoft have done in the past, if not worse, Microsoft's main anti-competative fines were to do with restricting other companies, Google is restricting not only companies, but individual users of its programme's such as AdWords and YouTube.

    As for the select others going on about Mac's, lets not forget which company had to bail Apple out, who gave them access to their Office suit and plenty of other idea's that Apple have used and tried to push as their own innovations. If you want to use a Mac, use a Mac. Don't come on the internet trying to say that it is a better OS, as let's face it, they are completly different. Apple is designed to be easier to use, while Microsoft is designed to be more productive. This is why, even though it may not look as pretty, it still owns a huge market share, especially among companies because it is better for doing the task at hand. Both OS's have their good and bad sides, just pick what you want and leave it at that.

  42. true.back says:

    "Bing doesn't copy google's results. That's FUD that google has been feeding the fanboys to make MS look bad."

    Supposedly most peoples here can't understand technical side of what Google have shown in that experiment – but easy, there are IT specialists who can.

    Non – professionals however may wonder why MS haven't sued Google for this FUD – …because it's true?

    For sure it's not just copying – it's very close to spyware integrated into operating system… oh, but You may call it "feature" that allows to inform Bing about Windows user preferences, choices etc.

    Sony was less lucky:

    en.wikipedia.org/…/Sony_BMG_copy_protection_rootkit_scandal

    … but they haven't possibility to integrate the rootkit so deeply – they don't have Windows source code (at least officially).

    Jonny B:

    "Nobody ever seems to think about the fact that the power given to google by the crowd by using their search services should in turn bring some responsabilities for google."

    If you worry so much about Google monopoly then what do you say about MS monopoly in operating systems? oh yes, MS monopoly is good and Google Monopoly is Bad.

    Google is sponsoring many free projects, gives tons of software for free, has HUGE share in Open Source/Free Software development and have just best search engine ever created. That's painfull – they even don't use Windows – they are using Linux.

    Personally I prefer Google monopoly over Yours – and it looks I'm not alone…

  43. Michael P. Shipley says:

    Why doesn't MS just make it's own Youtube clone and keep Google out?

  44. Joe says:

    I think this is very good written article and I must say that I do see some concerns my self about competition in SE's.

    I think Microsoft (Bing) should close their eyes and not try to go into same markets like google does, create something that Google hasn't done yet. Pay your employee dollar or two more rather than spending millions on ads on TV.

    Sincerely,

    CEO of MWD – Tech

  45. jim says:

    @Dan James

    "Some are saying "youtube is google's site, its up to them who they let use it". This is not the case, Windows is Microsofts OS, but they cant stop other companies installing software on it. What do you think Google would do if one day Chrome stopped working on Windows, and the response from Microsoft was "well its our OS and you cant use it". If this was the case, Google would have been dead and buried years ago, as Microsoft could just ban people from going on Google."

    But it is like that, after all apple has a walled garden with iOS and we can see this when it didn't allow flash to be used. A similar thing can also be found with apple not allowing Mac OSX to be installed on other hardware (hackintosh) as it is against their terms and conditions. If you really agree with this then you are against terms and conditions stated by every company. Try not to be too bias with the situation, Microsoft has as much blame as Google. It would be interesting to see an article which discusses both sides rather than this battle ground of comments.

  46. really? says:

    Maybe Google would be playing nicer if Microsoft was not stealing Googles search indexes.

  47. lol says:

    aren't these the same sort of tactics Microsoft used to push out the far inferior(at the time) Direct X technology?

  48. Alberto (Switzerland) says:

    I am surprised by this Microsoft attitude. Every Windows box in Europe comes pre-configured with IE and Bing and 95% of the Europeans have to manually change the default search engine to Google.

    Wake up Microsoft ! It is your products that do not work !

    I have been a big Windows fan for many years but Microsoft has exaggerated in trying to squeeze every possible penny out of my pocked by over segmenting the market (at least 30 different Windows 7 versions, where nobody is still able to understand if a feature is not working or it has been deactivated in a stripped down version of windows – starter/home/premium/enterprise/etc). The same for Windows Mobile (I had all my 3 old phones on WM).

    But now I have switched to Android for the phone and planning to move to MacOs for my office work. Much smpler, back to basic

  49. laZee says:

    I can easily remove my website from Googles index, like not giving them the permission to index my site. Same thing here, no permission for MS for indexing a site. Its fair.

  50. Alberto (Switzerland) says:

    I am surprised by this Microsoft attitude. Every Windows box in Europe comes pre-configured with IE and Bing and 95% of the Europeans have to manually change the default search engine to Google. Wake up Microsoft ! It is your products that do not work !

    I have been a big Windows fan for many years but Microsoft has exaggerated in trying to squeeze every possible penny out of my pocket by over segmenting the market (at least 30 different Windows 7 versions, where nobody is still able to understand if a feature is not working or it has been deactivated in a stripped down version of windows – starter/home/premium/enterprise/etc). The same for Windows Mobile (I had all my 3 old phones on WM), where in Europe you cannot even change your WM6  phone language without paying extra euros.

    But now I have switched to Android for the phone and planning to move to MacOs for my office work. Much smpler, back to basic. Pay once and it works.

  51. Jake says:

    This might have been credible if Bing wasn't stealing Google's search results.

  52. Microsoft Failed says:

    All I'm hearing in this article, is "Wahhhh, they caught us being bad, so are are going to sue them!"(googleblog.blogspot.com/…/microsofts-bing-uses-google-search.html) and "Wahhhh, they do things better than us, so we want to make sure they can't!" How about this Microsoft? Make your stuff better, and don't copy what others have done!  To quote your article, " But it shouldn’t be permitted to pursue practices that restrict others from innovating and offering competitive alternatives."  So what you are saying here, is that it was OK for you to "pursue practices that restrict others from innovating and offering competitive alternatives", but not for other companies?  There are countless other search engines that are also free, but most people don't use them, because they aren't that good, and don't display very good results, but people are free to use them if they want, and they won't be pushed towards Google's programs, even though they are the most innovative company on the web, and for the most part, their products work better than anyone elses, so they are simply providing easy access to the best products.  "Finally, we share the concerns expressed by many others that Google discriminates against would-be competitors by making it more costly for them to attain prominent placement for their advertisements."  Remind me again, where on your page is the Google advertising? I can't seem to find it, even when searching "Google" in Bing, however, when searching Microsoft in Google, the ads show at least 2 resuls that go to Microsoft websites.  This lawsuit you are filing it petty, and useless, as you are worse than them!

  53. N8ter says:

    Sadly, only the Google fans and idiots came to comment on this post.  Well, 95% of them, anyways…

  54. Maserati says:

    How's it feel Microsoft ?

  55. Proman says:

    This has got to be some sort of a joke. All of these concerns seem to be in connection to JUST YouTube. A site, which, no matter how popular, is still just ONE site and, as has been said, belongs to Google. Google cannot be accused of preventing Bing from accessing other sites and without there is absolutely no merit to this post. It's weak and it is shameful.

  56. Phil O Neill says:

    Microsoft getting the hump about someone else adopting the same aggressive business practices as they do.Now thats a laugh.Netscape anybody?

  57. Jim Leon says:

    Isn't this what Microsoft has and had been doing for years?  It's called free enterprise, Bill Gates!

  58. Chris says:

    Dear Brad Smith,

    How much does Microsoft pay you? They should pay me instead, because you're obviously wasting their money.  Google has a YouTube API that lets you search by categories, keywords, etc.

    <sarcasm> Oh look at this… its also available for DOT NET programmers. How interesting…</sarcasm>

    code.google.com/…/developers_guide_dotnet.html

    Now start working with your coders and not your lawyers.

    Hell, why don't you start your own video sharing site to compete with YouTube?

  59. Mister Snitch says:

    YouTube has every right to restrict search results. But I think it is a valid argument that it is anticompetitive for Google to restrict results to SOME search engines, and not others. And clearly, they are merely trying to benefit their own search engine here.

    I think MS has a good and fairly important case here, and I hope they will prevail. However, winning this case will not in any way change their standing as a 'fallen' technology company. They are very much yesterday's news.

  60. Chas says:

    This is really rich coming from Microsoft, the original bullies of the tech world.  You people are truly pathetic.

  61. Now you know what it feels like Microsoft says:

    When Eric Schmidt ran Novell he got a full look at the Microsoft Playbook .

    Hes just using this knowledge to monopolise the search market as Microsoft did in the Server Market .Man up and take  the slaping .

  62. Voovir says:

    how the mighty have fallen lol its about time someone gave Microsoft a black eye

  63. Dave Orr (Scotland) says:

    I think it is nothing but sour grapes from Microsoft.

    For many years they dominated,bulldozing all opposition and now the table has turned thanks to Google and Open Source (Linux etc).

    Its about time ALL parties got together and co-operate and do whats best for us consumers instead of Shareholders.

  64. Daryll McC says:

    The only thing good in my book about Microsoft is the XBox 360 and for that im 1st to give them a pat on the back as it is WAY better than PS3…but as for Windows lol its such a crash prone virus prone piece of poo and as for Bing?? well you can guess my thoughts….. no wonder i use Ubuntu,Open Office and GOOGLE!

  65. Arun says:

    Hypocrisy full stop

  66. Mark says:

    No wonder the YouTube App on Windows Phone 7 sucks so bad. I never thought to blame Google until now.

  67. Nigel Hawketts says:

    After some of the stunts that Microsoft have pulled over the years, especially on the web, this thick-skinned arrogance plunges new depths, even by your shoddy standards.

  68. Lk says:

    Ahahaha silly MS, you've controlled things for far too long, see how it feels to be stepped on for a change.

  69. Hezus says:

    Microsoft, this your fundamental problem not in hiring legal counsel, clearly well reasoned here, but it is the fruit of a poisonous tree. Stop trying to compete with someone that is doing something well, just leave them be. Only intervene where someone is doing something poorly please, and setup a special fund and unit for this, like Apple with their tight controls on devices and content, it's no longer innovative, it's expensive, exclusive, and stale, why don't you buy them. Because affording content shouldn't be for rich people, use your excellent legal prowess there. If in competition continue to be friendly please. Can you please also partner with Google to create the world's first kids only ad-free search engine!

  70. Hezus says:

    "First, in 2006 Google acquired YouTube—and since then it has put in place a growing number of technical measures to restrict competing search engines from properly accessing it for their search results.  Without proper access to YouTube, Bing and other search engines cannot stand with Google on an equal footing in returning search results with links to YouTube videos and that, of course, drives more users away from competitors and to Google." Who cares, people search YouTube for YouTube speak with tech use the internet! What is proper access? How exactly isn't it equal? Fix it now, all agreements are non-negtioable, and all are the same, they are standard.

    "Second, in 2010 and again more recently, Google blocked Microsoft’s new Windows Phones from operating properly with YouTube. Google has enabled its own Android phones to access YouTube so that users can search for video categories, find favorites, see ratings, and so forth in the rich user interfaces offered by those phones.  It’s done the same thing for the iPhones offered by Apple, which doesn’t offer a competing search service." Why Google? Fix it now, all agreements are non-negtioable, and all are the same, they are standard.

    "Unfortunately, Google has refused to allow Microsoft’s new Windows Phones to access this YouTube metadata in the same way that Android phones and iPhones do.  As a result, Microsoft’s YouTube “app” on Windows Phones is basically just a browser displaying YouTube’s mobile Web site, without the rich functionality offered on competing phones.  Microsoft is ready to release a high quality YouTube app for Windows Phone.  We just need permission to access YouTube in the way that other phones already do, permission Google has refused to provide." Fix it now, all agreements are non-negtioable, and all are the same, they are standard.

    Fix it now, all agreements are non-negtioable, and all are the same, they are standard.

  71. Hezus says:

    And post all my comments within 24 hours or I won't make anymore! :)

  72. splogger jones says:

    Haha jealous Microsoft??

    Bing is appalling and the adverts reek of desperation!

    Nice to see MS complaining for once!

  73. David says:

    'On any given day, more than half of all Europeans use a computer and more than 90 percent of them look for information about goods and services on their computer.  Indeed, the European Commission’s Digital Agenda made clear that commerce is moving online, where two-thirds of Europeans begin their shopping process.  It’s therefore critical that computers move forward in an open, fair and competitive manner.'

    See what I did there?

    You make a passing comment about irony, but for many people their hatred of Microsoft cannot be passed off with such a light touch. Microsoft's anti-competitive practices have set computing back at least ten years – how many people still code not to standards but to IE6?

    After this move, and your current move against Apple, you've proved that you are bereft of ideas and are merely a shell of a company, nothing more than SCO with a budget. (Remember SCO? You funded their last lawsuit…)

  74. Francisco says:

    You have to be kidding me.!!! Microsoft You are pathetic and a shame to the industry.

  75. Peter Griffin says:

    Hey Microsoft instead of filing anti-trust suits, why don't you hire more competent people, maybe ousting Steve Ballmer who single handly destroyed the company is your answer to your obvious problems. Instead of acting like whining b-words do something other than going after the company that is better than you in the first place.

  76. Frank D Stallone says:

    I think someone is upset that they can't use their desktop monopoly to force Bing on people. Mind you, I give you credit for trying but people just don't like it.

    I think someone is upset as well they got caught out for pinching search data from Google search. All in all it sounds like someone created a product that just isn't as good so they're going to cry to the EU about it.

  77. Rhys says:

    A Bing search for this page "Adding our Voice to Concerns about Search in Europe" lists a lot of aggregators but the not this site. On Google? #1. Unbelievable. Google are indexing Microsoft content better and faster than Microsoft.

  78. Jason says:

    What a load of bull!  Microsoft aka former bully of the software world is finally getting a taste of its own medicine.  Dear Microsoft, Google has been a wonderful breath of fresh air in comparison to the toxic fumes still rising above Redmond, Wa.  So sorry that you can no longer BUY your way into fame and fortune!  Now, you will have to actually work for it just like everyone else has had to do.  Dear Readers, don't get a life get a real operating system by purchasing Apple!

  79. George (UK) says:

    There are two sides to this argument:

    MS is a massive corporation that has certainly taken advantage of their ridiculous market share, and has done its fair share of questionable things in the past.

    The point being, is that they are no the most "reputable" people to be doing this, as at some point they have done some things just as bad, making this slightly hypocritical. On the other hand in this case, I think they are right (to a certain degree).

    However, Google is also now very large; having had to compete with MS products and services. It is now taking its dominance perhaps a little too far, and this lawsuit might make them realize this.

    Especially as I have read some experiences from small business owners getting fraudulently charged by Google. (I don't know about other countries laws but I suspect there are similar laws)That this is not acceptable by law in shops and businesses in the UK to practice this, why should they get away with it?

    The short answer is they shouldn't. It is taking advantage of their monopoly a little too much.

    I also think one of the reasons that Bing is doing so badly is because of how bad it is. The search results are not great, and it was not the lack of Youtube links etc that lead me to continue using Google. It is the simplicity that attracted me. Google is starting to lose its appeal to me as it loses its clear approach to things.

    As the giants squabble, we are left to deal with the wreckage. Lets face facts. Both companies are trying to better each other, now instead of new and innovative products Google appears to be doing it underhandedly, but let us not forget that MS has also done its own dastardly deeds! (using Google search results in Bing but to name one)

    Maybe…

    Possible boycott of BOTH companies and use Yahoo/other providers? (that will shut them both up!)

    Mass email spam of BOTH Google and MS's company email accounts?

    Julian, I do this also!

    To conclude, thanks for reading (its long!) I think both have become too big for their own good, both need to take a long hard look at themselves and decided: "Do our users want this?" they will realize that no-one cares and wants this, and hopefully correct their ways.

  80. John Beckett (Surrey, England) says:

    WOW!!! Microsoft is losing the war in search engine technology, and it's crying!! Boo Hoo!!  Think of all the rubbish M$ has bundled up with their bug ridden operating systems in the hope of strangling any kind of competition… very much the pot calling Kettle.

    Lets also not forget that Bing is crap, really crap!!  That much so, Bing was accused by google, in a sting operation that proves Bing has been watching what people search for on Google, the sites they select from Google’s results, then uses that information to improve Bing’s own search listings.

    So Brad, I think you should shut up and put up!

  81. im3.co.uk says:

    I don't know quite what you expect to achieve long term, but you need to up the game with Bing because it's an awful resource compared to what Google has to offer.

  82. Robert T. says:

    Excuse me? This entire article is full of blatant bs. This is just Microsoft complaining because they finally realized that companies such as Google are better then them. People use google search because its the best one. If People don't like your product which is Bing, then add new features  and make it better. Don't come here and complain about it.

  83. Geoff Wright says:

    April fools right?

  84. El Gee says:

    Good to see some power behind addressing what is a sinister corporation: 'Accidentally' scooping data while building street view. Never in a zillion years was that an accident, so 3 issues arise. 1 Google are total liars when they get caught. 2. Why did they scoop data that had nothing what so ever to do with their exercise recording publicly owned information. 3. Just what else are they up to without our knowledge. I perceive google to be the single biggest threat to my personal information security and future freedom on the web. Stop them. Now.

  85. leoplan2 says:

    fanboys like you will say everything Microsoft (or Google or Apple, depending on your bias) does is fine, and you believe their PR, even if they do very nasty things, but I'm so sorry to tell you that truth is different.

    Microsoft is losing some marketshare to Apple and to Google, and their #1 enemy is Google… so instead of trying to internationalize bing, in order to make it better, they are bullying Google, and instead of providing interoperability in the web, they are still pushing proprietary things, e. g. Silverlight, (also Google is also pushing their Native Client crap)… So, see reality and leave your fanboism, please.

    Maybe Google is doing a big mistake by "blocking" YouTube on WP7, and that's not OK, neither the fact that Google wanted control with their Book Settlement, and they deserve a penalty, but it is not fair to throw FUD against them. (like "Google reads your e-mails" and "Google Android is not free", etc)

    I think Microsoft is afraid of Google because Google is a Linux supporter, and also Google has open source events (like the Google Summer of Code). Linux and OSS are enemies of Microsoft, and now they are growing a lot.

    Microsoft is not committed to an open web, albeit Google is a little more committed to (they made a big mistake, the Verizon-Google net neutrality proposal, so sad).  

  86. polaco says:

    NO ES LA CULPA LA DEL CHANCHO SINO DEL QUE LE DA DE COMER…

  87. RichardFC says:

    The EU imposes terrible hurdles for American business to thrive in its jurisdiction. Google and Microsoft should instead be working together to settle this internally and not through the EU. These two companies should be lobbying together to reform the EU's business practices.

  88. Tom Smitch says:

    Blah blah blah, go cry to mommy.

  89. Sree says:

    Fools day wishes MS!

  90. Phil says:

    I did have to chuckle at all you ignorant shmucks coming out to bad mouth Microsoft. The really sad thing is you've all bought into Google's we "do no evil" completely… Google are a profit making company, they will do what's best for their shareholders (you're pretty much just an idiot if you think they're doing all this for the good of consumers) to make money that is all. That's why their terms for everything are ridiculously strict, their serps shambolic (I get far more relevant results most of the time from Bing rather than Google), their top 3 adwords ads blend in with the organic listings, they steal content from sites (do an image search, notice this doesn't actually send you to the image's site without extra clicks) and they have literally NO customer support whatsoever unless you spend $$$ to name but a few of their problems. Not to mention they've actually admitted to wanting to get right up to the creepy line in terms of personal information they keep on people. Oh and another thing, they rarely even innovate any more, you know what their latest "innovation" is? A clone of Facebook's "Like" button, the +1 button, nice eh?

    Now I'm not a MS fanboy, they have been just as bad in times past but Google need to be kept in line. This comments section has shown that there are a lot of people out there who need to educate themselves better on the problems with Google.

  91. Andy says:

    This brought a big smile to my face. Well done Google. Stop trying to copy Microsoft. You are decades behind the work done by Google, why should they let you just jump in on their innovation? I'm in Europe and I use Google, because Google works and I don't want to use anything else.

  92. William says:

    Payback is a b*tch aint it microsoft?  Funny how they do the same stuff, yet complain if someone else does it.  Make bing the default, and everytime an update happens, revert your default back to bing, then file complains about unfairly directing traffic to google's search engine.

  93. Ben says:

    Talk about sore losers. People choose Google search because it's the best. Bing is a pile of crap. It's up to the user what search site they use. Maybe next you can Sue all the other companies who provide better Browsers then you?

  94. Anonymous. says:

    Maybe Mr Brad Smith you should spend the money you have just wasted in trying to improve your search instead of trying to screw google.

    If your products weren't so *** perhaps people would use them.

  95. Brad says:

    Before MS says anything about this MS should remove that crap internet explorer browser from windows or at least give users a choice. IE is only used because most people don't know much about computer and internet browsers that is why IE is ever used.

  96. Matthew Jackson says:

    'Having spent more than a decade wearing the shoe on the other foot with the European Commission, the filing of a formal antitrust complaint is not something we take lightly.'

    It's very nice that you embrace competition for search but really, I wonder why you approach the European competition authorities as an American.

  97. Dan James says:

    @Matthew Jackson

    Because they do business in the EU…. the USA has no say in what they can or can't do in Europe.

  98. mursalat says:

    Hi,

    i just cant stop laughing, "invest literally billions of dollars annually to offer Bing" – yeah you guys invest billions in a search engine even i can program, i mean where are the algorithms to actually see what you are looking for?? i mean you guys base your search results on what?? because it doesn't come close to what i am looking for.. and if it does then i must have put in google, to go to google.com – here is an example, i was unable to find your blog through bing, but through google i was… seriously?? even the blog that claims that bing is better??

    You wanna compete? then learn how to, before you start saying you are too good to compete with, so we want you brought down — seriously, lose your job at microsoft, and join google 😀

  99. Guest says:

    World's largest monopoly is complaining about competition? The world is coming to an end users, sing your last prayers!!

  100. dan says:

    Has to be an April fool?

    Microsoft claiming unfair business practices – ha!!

  101. captdragon says:

    A taste of your own medicine. How is it? Bitter huh? Choke on that for a while.

  102. Tim Blane says:

    "Third, Google is seeking to block access to content owned by book publishers. … Under Google’s plan only its search engine would be able to return search results from these books. "

    This is a bit rich isn't it? Google are physically scanning the books to put on their search engine. Is Microsoft claiming that they should have the right to include the results of Google's scanning efforts directly into your own Bing search results? I don't think Google could/would stop Microsoft scanning books and doing the same thing but why should you be able to incorporate it without at least minimal effort? Just because it's electronic doesn't give you the automatic right to access it or can I go ahead and use all electronic documents/services Microsoft produce for my own search purposes? I reckon you'd refuse me being able to rip all your bing maps and making my own maps system from the MetaData.

    Why not just scan your own books and index it!? It's out of copyright and you would have the technology.. oh and add some value by scanning all Microfilms held in Libraries of Church/parish records in England – that's something nobody has done and would actually be usefull.

  103. mssucks says:

    Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.

  104. Jason McDonald says:

    I agree that, generally speaking, Google is a monopoly and behaves as such.  But the real battle in search isn't really between Microsoft and Google (you guys have lost that war).  It's between Google and Facebook.  The regulators are just too slow to regulate these issues.  http://www.jm-seo.org/.

  105. Jeremy says:

    It's the pot calling the kettle black

  106. techdog says:

    Some say that this is a case of the "pot calling the kettle black".

    I say, not necessarily.  

    My guess is that MSFT would much prefer that the anti-trust regulators just mind their own business and leave the big tech companies alone.   But given that the anti-trust regulators will inevitably want to micromanage the situation from time to time, MSFT is better off trying to create a level playing field.  

  107. Jeff says:

    Over 90% of the world uses Windows. Every single copy of Windows comes installed with Internet Explorer, which is uninstallable. Internet Explorer has Bing as the default search engine. This is probably the most anti-competitive thing I've ever heard of in the search engine/Internet Browser space.

    Windows Phone 7 makes the search engine Bing a hardware integrated manufacturing requirement with the physical search button. Bing is unchangeable and cannot be removed. This is probably the most anti-competitive thing I've ever heard of in the search engine for Mobile space. Microsoft should consider itself very lucky that Google doesn't do the same for Android.

    "At Microsoft we’ve shown that we’re prepared to work hard and invest literally billions of dollars annually to offer Bing" Yes you do spend billions buy making deals with other companies to try to shove Bing down our throats. Making a deal with Verizon to make Bing the default and uninstallable search engine on select Android phones come to mind. Also buying Yahoo and making an automatic search on Bing when you search for a name in Facebook that doesn't come up with a user from your friends list. Elop striking the very suspect deal with Microsoft to put WP7/Bing/Windows Live/AdCenter/Zune/Office/Silverlight on all their new phones. Microsoft sure does invest Billions in MARKETING Bing, too bad Bing is awful.

    As far as the whole YouTube complaint, that's just ridiculous and is barely worth mentioning. YouTube provides an API for people to freely use, you just can't use their logo and trademarks. I think Microsoft might want to spend some time making their actual WP7 phones compatible with internet technologies like Flash and HTML5 so that they could actually support the YouTube website. Bing indexes over half YouTube's video's so what's the problem here? Furthermore YouTube is a website, not an app! I could go sooo much further as to why this argument is ridiculous.

    Google took the time to scan over a million books, than ran them through their own Optical Character Recognition software, as well they bought ReCaptcha and brilliantly used that software to help. After all the man hours Microsoft decides "Thank for doing all that work Google. Now All your data r belongs to us". Google did create that monopoly, because they're the only ones doing it, go do it yourself losers, the book ruling is a huge step in the opposite direction for digitization of information. As for the Yahoo acquistion, I don't get what your argument is, Google tried to buy Yahoo to strengthen their search, the government said it would create a monopoly so Microsoft bought them.

    Process of moving from Google AdWords to MS AdCenter:

    – Export your Adwords campaigns to CSV

    – Import CSV file into adCenter

    Yes its actually that easy folks. Brad Smith again makes another claim without any evidence.

    Fifth point yes Google does make it so you can't have a competing search engine on the same page, though any company can choose to use Bing if they want, they just can't use both. This is the closest thing to an actual point this whole article makes.

    The sixth point is the previous Microsoft funded lawsuit about aggregator sites getting downranked because basically they're aggregators.

    Brad Smith's points are enough to make some ridiculous PR editorial piece but they sure as hell won't stand up in any decent court. Microsoft you've stopped innovating, Google is beating you at email, internet search, cloud productivity apps, mobile, internet browsing, maps and you can't quite understand why people aren't being herded like cows with your Billions of dollars to WP7, Bing, Hotmail and Internet Explorer so now your saying Google is being anticompetitive.

    Wake up Microsoft! Google's products are better in every regard that's why we choose them, not because competition is being impeded. The internet is a market of perfect competition, the best product wins, not the most marketed!

  108. James says:

    Pot. Kettle. Black.

  109. Oliver says:

    Thanks for the sympathetic article. I wanted to check out the microsoft adCenter and I get an error message about my Google Chrome not being supported. Also very ironic.

  110. Jon says:

    Give us a break, Brad and Microsoft.  You have a largely frivolous case, with the YouTube results claim being the only quasi-valid among the bunch.  Stop wasting Microsoft's and Google's money over such garbage, and have a little respect for your users: every time you waste a few million on a case like this, the users are the ones who end up footing the bill.  

  111. nDante says:

    ¿Duele? Pues a joderse. Nadie dice nada de vuestro windows por defecto en todos los PCs. ¿De que mierda os quejais? Que caradura que tiene esta empresa.

    "It's hurt? F**k you. No one say a word about windows in all new PCs. What Are you complaining about? This company has a real cheek"

  112. Michael says:

    You F**king Cheeky B**tards Micrsoft Go To F**king Hell!

  113. Mark Da Cunha says:

    Shame on Microsoft — what a bunch of hypocrites.

    Google.com is google's property and not Microsoft's or the government's. As such, Google as the inalienable right to set the terms of their contracts as they see fit — and if you don;t like their proposal then no on is forcing you to sign it.

    Google is doing now in the "search engine wars" what Microsoft did during the "browser wars" with Internet Explorer a decade ago. And to think I defended Microsoft's right to its property.

    http://www.capitalismmagazine.com/…/225-the-department-of-justice-s-assault-on-microsoft-who-is-the-predator-and-who-is-the-victim.html

  114. david w says:

    Wow.  People really believe this?  There is no proof and they're actually afraid of the search algorithms.

    Google got the lion's share by virtue of being the best not because of intentional business practices aimed at eliminating competition.  Every time a company enjoys such success we let our government take it away and monitor what's left.

    Being Google I would separate the various branches now and let their famous search engine put it all back together becuase it will.  Their results have nothing to do with advertising except where paid advertisers will hit the top of the list.  So small business don't hit the top of the list.  What about the superbowl commercials?  same thing. Let's have anti-trust suits agains the NFL, NBA, ABA and NHL.  They determine who sponsors and oddly enough it's usually based upon money not anything else.  If you think that's wrong go ahead and flame me because I'm tired of Microsoft who owns Windows and more than 67% of the PC Operating SYstem Market.

    Who needs a decision engine?  I make my own.  

  115. Paolo paolo.pomponi@gmail.com says:

    Look what they do to me…..

    The steal and copy my concept of +1

    hybridcities.blogspot.com/…/prove-that-1-google-button-is-stolen-as.html

  116. lololol says:

    y u mad tho microsoft :(

  117. Paolo Pomponi says:

    Fax sent on 15 April 2011 to Google Inc.: Subject: Google +1 Button concept: fraud. http://tiny.cc/3g1l9

  118. JOe says:

    a taste of your own medicine, this is what microsoft used to do, monopolize LOL good for Google

  119. Edwardsimon says:

    An impressive post, I just gave this to a colleague who is doing a little analysis on this topic. And he is very happy and thanking me for finding it. But all thanks to you for writing in such simple words. Big thumb up for this blog post!

    http://www.facebook.com/jobopeningz

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