NLJ’s “Tales of the Recession”


Posted by David Bowermaster 
Administrator, Microsoft on the Issues

Earlier this week the National Law Journal published an interesting package of stories entitled, “Tales of the Recession.”    It is a series of 10 profiles of individuals who represent various corners of the legal profession, from a law student and a former associate to a county judge and a law school dean.   Each profile explores how the economic crisis has affected each person’s work, priorities and outlook for the future.   NLJ interviewed Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith to find out how the recession has impacted his job leading Microsoft’s in-house legal department and interacting with our many law firm partners.    The entire package is worth a read – even for the non-lawyers out there.

Comments (1)

  1. Anonymous says:

    In a recession it common for middle management to engage in self preservation tendencies and get into automatic tendencies of saving their own to encourage loyalty in people who fit their cultural norms. Unfortunately this can have devastating effects to minorities who are usually late comers who perceived not fit the culture and their loyalty usually in question. Discrimination has become so sophisticated and covert that senior leadership must use new strategies to fight it.    Is it possible that a corporation can grow so large that it would not know when a few of its senior/middle managers can be engaged in covert discrimination activities and not know it?   Is it not the responsibility of those who care enough about Microsoft vision to expose such managers for the sake of the Microsoft? Has Microsoft adopted a knee-jerk automatic reaction to fight any lawsuit and win at any cost? Is it okay for Microsoft to contract out such cases with directives to win at all costs? For those who care enough about the Microsoft and want to root-out a cancer within the corporation, what would you do; try to litigate as far as you can go knowing you have no match in resources and resolve or engage a public discussion?