YouthSpark Challenge for Change Inspires Socially-Conscious Youth


YouthSpark Challenge for Change Inspires Socially-Conscious Youth

Microsoft YouthSpark Challenge for Change is a global contest that encourages young people who are passionate about social causes to submit their ideas for how they can spark social good in their communities, schools or throughout the world, using Microsoft technologies. Microsoft believes that nothing matches the creativity and passion of youth, so we created this contest to inspire and reward young people who want to make the world a better place. Now in its third year, Microsoft YouthSpark Challenge for Change expanded to include a new, younger age group: 13-17 year-olds. Now, young people aged 13-25 from all countries (except those embargoed from doing business with Microsoft) who wish to create positive change in small or big ways are welcome to participate in the contest. 

Today, 30 finalists (15 from each age group: 13-17 and 18-25) were selected from the thousands of submissions received from youth hailing from more than 100 countries. Out of those 30 finalists, five are from Asia!

Meet our five finalists from Asia, whose ideas may be new and untested, or something they’ve been doing for years.

Sonal Jain Padamchand

India

Sonal strongly believes that receiving a quality education is the first and most significant step to resolving social issues like poverty, unemployment and gender inequality. She volunteers with low-income schools to conduct workshops to help children realise their full potential, and hopes to expand this approach through a network of mentors to even more places.

View her project plan here.

Yashasvi Raj Pant

Nepal

Women’s safety, including that of his sister and mother, is Yashasvi’s biggest concern. He is creating a mobile app called 'Women Safety' that sends an SMS to relatives and police stations if a woman is in danger and also conducts seminars and awareness programmes to educate women about harassment and ways to defend against it.

View his project plan here.

Abhishek Paudel

Nepal

Abhishek believes that all people should have access to basic health services, however, due to an acute shortage of medical specialists in Nepal who are separated from most of the population living in remote places, this is not possible. Telemedicine is an innovative solution that could change this.

View his project plan here.

Nishit Sangomla

India

Nishit believes that electrifying rural households holds the key to educating people, and intends to create low-cost, hybrid energy systems for rural electrification.

View his project plan here.

Roopam Sharma

India
By using the ‘Emancipator’, a real-time location tracking system that utilises geo-fencing and wearable technology, Roopam plans to assist people suffering from dementia and related disorders.

View his project plan here.

 

Help choose the finalists!

Now through 14 May, the public can vote once per day, per age group, for their favorite project to help select the ten grand prize winners (five per age group). Finalists will be announced on 27 May. To help voters, each of the 30 finalists created a video to share more about themselves and their projects. Check out all of the finalists and their projects here.

All 30 finalists have already won a Surface Pro 3 (or equivalent device) with Office 365. The ten grand prize winners will receive a volunteer travel experience in Nicaragua, $2,500 cash to kick-start their projects and a Windows Phone.

This contest is part of Microsoft YouthSpark, our company-wide commitment to create education, employment and entrepreneurship opportunities for young people around the world.

Read the Official Contest Rules for full details on eligibility.

 

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