Software Factories


Software factories have been around for some time now originating from work done at the SEI. http://www.sei.cmu.edu/plp/plp_init.html


Recently Keith Short and Jack Greenfield from the VS Enterprise Tools group have been writing a book on the subject. Jack has a good introduction in terms of photography at http://msdn.microsoft.com/architecture/community/newsletter/default.aspx#Contemplate3 and the web site for the book is at http://www.softwarefactories.com/.


Finally the book will be available in July from amazon at http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0471202843/qid=1081956906/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-9718537-7522515?v=glance&s=books. Have a look at the book description on this site.


 


 


 

Comments (5)

  1. Anonymous says:

    Interesting finds so far this week

  2. Matt Nicholson says:

    My understanding when I interviewed Steve Cook was that Patterns and DSLs are two of the components that could play a part in a software factory, and that models – while also a potential component – are not mandatory. Would be good to get Steve’s own take on this, though!

  3. Steve Cook says:

    The most essential component of a software factory is a software factory schema. This describes precisely what artifacts the factory deals with and how they are related. A software factory could, for example, be driven from wizards and explorers. A factory will be prepopulated with assets that instantiate the schema; the factory user will add new assets, modify the supplied ones, and where they are transformations, apply them. Models are nice, but not essential.

  4. theCoach says:

    mode-less

    or model-less [obviously the latter, but it confused me on first reading].