Exchange Web Services – What You Didn’t Know


Hey folks, we're back again with another video. We've already told you about how we're building the next version of Exchange to be cloud-ready and some of the cool features you can get through Outlook Web Access or Outlook Live. Today, we're giving you an overview of some of the work we've been doing to make it easier for developers & partners to hook into Exchange.

We've always had a 'best together' experience with Outlook, but our core email functionality & many other pieces of Exchange have of course always been open to other clients using standard protocols. In Exchange 2007 we introduced Exchange Web Services (EWS) and in the next version of Exchange (codenamed Exchange 14) we've continued to invest in making EWS even easier to use, with a managed client API, and you can use standard development tools to use EWS to access and manage the email, calendar, contacts & other content in mailboxes.

EWS is a very useful API for building custom apps against Exchange, and is even being adopted by competitors for products such as Apple's new mail client. To illustrate the openness take a look at the EWS-based Vista Gadget and the same widget for Mac OS X- a good illustration of a cross platform use of the same API.

Check out our video and demos and let us know if you have any questions or feedback!


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To access additional resources related to EWS, please visit the Exchange Server Developer Center on MSDN, and watch the Exchange Web Services Managed API session from PDC 2008 on Channel 9.

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Comments (9)
  1. William Lefkovics says:

    It is great to have a single API going forward to make "developing for Exchange easier than ever before." Given the historical, frustrating potpourri of APIs, such consolidation makes it easier on many levels.  Thanks guys.

  2. MattShadbolt says:

    Have to say guys – love the regular video posts… keep up the good work!

  3. Interesting stuff. Tell Albert to look into the camera and learn everything from head instead of using a teleprompter :)

  4. Oliness says:

    Looks good. Are there any plans for an Exchange web admin console (similar to the one IIS has)? This would be very useful.

  5. Jono says:

    Does this mean we don’t have to host PowerShell in our .Net applications to create mailboxes, etc or is this just talking about the client site interaction? As great as PowerShell is for the IT Pros, it is a beast to work with in .Net. I’d love a managed API like what IIS7 did with the Microsoft.Web.Administration.

  6. jean-marie dess says:

    It seems that this api does no permit to manage mailboxes , as create/delete mailbox.

    Very, very disappointing !!!

  7. jean-marie dess says:

    It seems that this api does no permit to manage mailboxes , as create/delete mailbox.

    Very, very disappointing !!!

  8. jean-marie dess says:

    It seems that this api does no permit to manage mailboxes , as create/delete mailbox.

    Very, very disappointing !!!

  9. ym baja says:

    Not sure you’d want to allow the ability to create/delete mailboxes.  Especially if you’ve got this available to the outside world.

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