The Field Guide to Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Cmdlets

To hear some people tell it, the world’s fastest-growing pastime is Lync Server cmdlet-watching. All over the world countless numbers of people, binoculars and notebooks in hand, are tramping through the woods and the underbrush, trying to spot the elusive Lync Server cmdlets. If bird-watching is “Your lifetime ticket to the theater of nature” then…

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Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Cmdlet Descriptions

What follows is an alphabetical list of the 530-plus cmdlets that appear in Microsoft Lync Server 2010. Each cmdlet includes a brief description extracted from the Lync Server PowerShell help file. The full help for each cmdlet can be found by clicking on the appropriate link.   Approve-CsDeviceUpdateRule Approves a device update rule that has…

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A Brief Introduction to Role-Based Access Control – Part 1

“If you want something done right, do it yourself.”  That, by the way, is excellent advice … unless, of course, you happen to be a Microsoft Lync Server 2010 administrator charged with managing thousands of users and multiple sites. After all, in a case like that, doing it yourself (right or wrong) might prove to…

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PSListModifiers

Most Microsoft Lync Server 2010 properties store a single value. For example, the MaxMeetingSize property for a given conferencing policy can be set to only one number. Which makes sense: the maximum meeting size can’t be set both to 100 and to 200. (You’re either on the bus or you’re off the bus.) Likewise, this…

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Removing Policies and Other Objects

  For the most part, the various Remove cmdlets found in the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 implementation of Windows PowerShell are simple and straightforward. For example, suppose you want to remove a voice policy that has the Identity site:Redmond. That’s fine; all you have to do is call Remove-CsVoicePolicy followed by the Identity of the…

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Working with TimeSpans and DateTimes

As if you didn’t have enough to worry about – um, enough to get excited about – here’s something new: TimeSpans and DateTimes. A number of Microsoft Lync Server 2010 property values are stored using the TimeSpan data format; this format is typically used to tell you how much time you (or the system) should…

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Changing the Lync Server Management Shell’s Default Folder

  When you first start the Lync Server Management Shell, your working folder is set, by default, to your user folder, something like C:\Users\kenmyer. (To find out what your user folder is, type $homepath at the Lync Server Management Shell prompt and press ENTER.) Is there a problem with using your user folder as your…

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Creating Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Objects

Windows PowerShell has some pretty strict standards when it comes to naming things. As you probably know by now, every PowerShell cmdlet consists of a verb and a noun. Not only that, but there are guidelines that define how a developer goes about choosing nouns, and some pretty strict guidelines that determine the verbs you…

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Assigning Policies

  So how do you grant (assign) policies? Well, to begin with, it’s important to keep in mind that the only policies that need to be assigned are the per-user policies. When you create a site, service, or global policy those policies are automatically assigned at the time your create them. If you create a…

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Filter vs. Where-Object

In this day and age, no one likes being told what to do. For instance, in the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 PowerShell documentation we invariably use the -Filter parameter or the -LdapFilter parameter any time we want to retrieve a targeted collection of user accounts. For example, if we want to return a collection of…

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