Register for July 31 SIGSOFT Webcast: Traceability Beyond Source Code: An Elusive Target?


Register TODAY for the next free ACM-SIGSOFT Webinar, "Traceability Beyond Source Code: An Elusive Target?" presented on Friday, July 31, 2015 at 12 pm ET (11 am CT/10 am MT/9 am PT/5 pm GMT) by Lionel C. Briand, University of Luxembourg. The talk will be moderated by Robert Dyer, Bowling Green State University; ACM SIGSOFT.
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This talk will report on more than a decade of experience regarding system traceability and its applications. Various forms of traceability between requirements, design decisions, and test cases are required by numerous industry standards. Traceability research is the focus of limited attention but is nevertheless an extremely important topic. Lionel will present an overview of the field and its challenges based on project experience with industry. Going through three recent projects, he will illustrate his main points and reflections on the subject. The focus of this presentation will be on traceability between requirements, design decisions, and test cases, as traceability research has been largely code-centric to date.
Duration: 60 minutes (including audience Q&A)

 Presenter: Lionel C. Briand, University of Luxembourg
Lionel C. Briand is professor and FNR PEARL chair in software verification and validation at the SnT Centre for Security, Reliability, and Trust, University of Luxembourg, and serves as Vice-Director of the Centre. Lionel has conducted applied research in collaboration with industry for more than 20 years. In the past, he headed up the Certus Center for Software Verification and Validation at Simula Research Laboratory. Before that, he was on the faculty of the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, as well as the Software Quality Engineering Department Head at the Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering in Germany, and worked as a research scientist for the Software Engineering Laboratory, a consortium of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, CSC, and the University of Maryland.
Lionel is an IEEE Fellow for his work on the testing of object-oriented systems. He was recently granted the IEEE Computer Society Harlan Mills Award and the IEEE Reliability Society Engineer-of-the-Year Award for his work on model-based verification and testing. His research interests include software testing and verification, model-driven software development, search-based software engineering, and empirical software engineering. Lionel has been involved in organizing and producing many international IEEE and ACM conferences. He is the co-editor-in-chief of Empirical Software Engineering (Springer) and serves on the editorial boards of Systems and Software Modeling (Springer) and Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability (Wiley).

 Moderator: Robert Dyer, Bowling Green State University; ACM SIGSOFT
Robert Dyer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Bowling Green State University. He received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 2013. His research areas are in software engineering, big data applications, and programming languages. Currently his research focuses on the Boa project, that provides a domain-specific language and infrastructure to allow researchers to easily mine a very large number of software repositories. Robert has served on the program committee for Modularity and OOPSLA Artifacts and reviewed for journals such as Empirical Software Engineering. He is currently a member of ACM SIGSOFT and SIGPLAN, and the ACM SIGSOFT Webinar Coordinator.

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