Windows 7 refreshed media creation


The fastest way to patch a Windows 7/Server 2008 R2 machine is to take advantage of the Convenience Update Rollup from April 2016 (KB3125574). The Conv. UR updates a lot of components and to ensure that that happens without any servicing problems, it has as a prerequisite the Servicing Stack Update from April 2015 (KB3020369). To install most of the other patches in between April 2016 and October 2016 we will include the following updates:

  1. KB3020369 (April 2015 Servicing Stack Update)
  2. KB3125574 (April 2016 Convenience Update Rollup)
  3. KB3177467 (September 2016 SSU)
  4. KB3172605 (July 2016 Functional Update Rollup, 7C* package)
  5. KB3179573 (August 2016 FUR, 8C* package)
  6. KB2841134 (Internet Explorer 11, Optional)
  7. KB3185330 (October 2016 Monthly Quality Rollup, 10B’ package [contains September 2016 FUR, 9C* package])

*3rd Tuesday package of that month.

Download all the packages from the Microsoft Update Catalog (now updated to work on all browsers) to a folder:

http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3020369
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3125574
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3177467
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3172605
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3179573
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=2841134
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3185330

Expand the .MSU files to extract the .CAB file which will be used with DISM:

image1

Command used:
expand -f:*Windows*.cab C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\*.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs (thank you abbodi1406)

Afterwards we should have the following:

image2

For this guide we will use the install.wim file from a Windows 7 Enterprise x64 SP1 Media:

image3

Mount the image as described in the offline servicing article below:

Add or Remove Packages Offline Using DISM
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824838.aspx

Dism /Mount-Image /ImageFile:C:\test\images\install.wim /Name:”Windows 7 ENTERPRISE” /MountDir:C:\test\offline

And now we can start adding the first package, the KB3020369 SSU:

Dism /Image:C:\test\offline /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.cab

image4

We can check the installation state using the command below:
Dism /Image:C:\test\offline /Get-Packages

It is in a “Install Pending” state:
Package Identity : Package_for_KB3020369~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.1.1
State : Install Pending
Release Type : Update
Install Time : 11/4/2016 9:11 AM

The next update to install is the Convenience Update Rollup KB3125574:

Dism /Image:C:\test\offline /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs\Windows6.1-KB3125574-v4-x64.cab

image5

Package Identity : Package_for_KB3125574~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.4.4
State : Install Pending
Release Type : Update
Install Time : 11/4/2016 10:33 AM

We cannot continue to install updates offline, because of the DISM limitation below:

Limitations

  • When you are installing a package in an offline image, the package state is “install pending” because of pending online actions. In other words, the package will be installed when the image is booted and the online actions are processed. If subsequent actions are requested, they cannot be processed until the previous pending online action is completed. You can use the /PreventPending option when you add a package with /AddPackage to skip the installation of a package when there are pending online actions.

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh825265.aspx

Commit the changes with the command below to seal the image:
Dism /Unmount-Image /MountDir:C:\test\offline /Commit

image6

Now we need to install a Windows 7 VM/PC with this image to finish the outstanding servicing actions and install the other updates. Do this either by hand or using your favorite deployment tool.

After the image is installed we should see the following (SP1 + KB3020369 + KB3125574 only):

C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Online /Get-Packages

Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
Version: 6.1.7600.16385

Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403

Packages listing:
Package Identity : Package_for_KB3020369~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.1.1
State : Installed
Release Type : Update
Install Time : 11/4/2016 12:29 AM

Package Identity : Package_for_KB3125574~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.4.4
State : Installed
Release Type : Update
Install Time : 11/4/2016 12:29 AM

Package Identity : Package_for_KB976902~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.1.1.17514
State : Installed
Release Type : Update
Install Time : 11/21/2010 3:01 AM

Continue to install updates 3-5 using the DISM commands below:

Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3177467-x64.cab

image7

Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3172605-x64.cab

image8

Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3179573-x64.cab

image9

 

Step 6, which is installing IE11, is optional, in case you have business critical applications that are dependent on an older Internet Explorer version. The security-only, monthly rollup, and preview rollup will not install or upgrade to these versions of Internet Explorer if they are not already present, so we will install IE11 next, before we apply the monthly rollup.

This will be the IE version installed, if we do not upgrade it:

image10

The last update to install is KB3185330, at the moment of writing this guide, in the future just replace it with the latest monthly/preview rollup, found on the page below:

Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 update history
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/22801/windows-7-and-windows-server-2008-r2-update-history

Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3185330-x64.cab

image11

Now we can search online for the remainder of the updates or just capture the image after generalizing it, if we want to finish as fast as possible.

Online search results after the above updates (34/39 optional updates are language packs):

image12

TL;DR version:

Download the updates:
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3020369
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3125574
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3177467
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3172605
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3179573
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=2841134
http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3185330

Extract CAB files from MSU:
expand -f:* C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\AMD64-all-windows6.1-kb3020369-x64_5393066469758e619f21731fc31ff2d109595445.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs
expand -f:* C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\AMD64-all-windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs
expand -f:* C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\AMD64-all-windows6.1-kb3177467-x64_42467e48b4cfeb44112d819f50b0557d4f9bbb2f.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs
expand -f:* C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\AMD64-all-windows6.1-kb3172605-x64_2bb9bc55f347eee34b1454b50c436eb6fd9301fc.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs
expand -f:* C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\AMD64-all-windows6.1-kb3179573-x64_0ec541490b3f7b02e41f26cb2c444cbd9e13df4d.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs
expand -f:* C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\AMD64-all-windows6.1-kb3185330-x64_8738d0ef3718b8b05659454cff898e8c4f0433d7.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs

Mount the image:
Dism /Mount-Image /ImageFile:C:\test\images\install.wim /Name:”Windows 7 ENTERPRISE” /MountDir:C:\test\offline

Install the first two updates offline:
Dism /Image:C:\test\offline /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.cab
Dism /Image:C:\test\offline /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs\Windows6.1-KB3125574-v4-x64.cab

Unmount and commit the changes to the install.wim file:
Dism /Unmount-Image /MountDir:C:\test\offline /Commit

Install a reference machine with the above install.wim file and continue to install the updates:
Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3177467-x64.cab
Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3172605-x64.cab
Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3179573-x64.cab
Dism /Online /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\temp\Windows6.1-KB3185330-x64.cab

Search online to install the remainder of the updates.

Sysprep the newly patched machine and capture an updated wim file.

 

If you have any questions or feedback, please use the comment section.

Thank you and see you next time!

Andrei Stoica, Windows Deployment Engineer


Comments (59)

  1. Luka says:

    Useless. How about you guys release a proper Service Pack 2 for Windows 7 or at least do all this work and re release ISO for Windows 7?

    1. Hi Luka,

      thank you for the comment. As part of the new servicing model we have moved away from the traditional service pack model for a more simplified servicing experience. You can consider the KB3125574 update as a “SP2” and update your Windows 7 image only with it. In the future, specifically later this year, we will have a follow-up update to KB3125574, which will also be a fully cumulative update, and we will only need to update our image with one or two KBs to be fully patched. The current prerequisite for Windows 7 updates is only SP1, when this will change the media will also be refreshed officially, as it was done for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 to include Update 3 KB3000850 November 2014 Update Rollup.

      1. OldMX says:

        Hey Andrei Stoica thank you for this detailed procedure, but while this is very easy to understand and follow, its really impractical, any idea on when is MS releasing an updated iso or an updated KB3125574 to reflect the monthly rollups?

        1. Not that I know of. As written in another comment, I will ask around. Regarding the follow-up update to KB3125574, the initial timeline was the summer of 2017. Thank you.

  2. Ami Casto says:

    Good stuff, Andrei!

  3. NP says:

    Andrei – thanks for taking the time to post that response. Let me more charitably restate Luka’s commment…

    The blog post provides a useable but very long and convoluted process for generating a really great updated Windows 7 WIM. Would it be possible for Microsoft to release an updated ISO which already has the pre-reqs, convenience update, and latest updates? Would it be possible to re-release that ISO once a quarter until Win 7 ends mainstream support in 3 years?

    We promise we’ll keep upgrading systems to Windows 10 even if it isn’t insanely painful to get updated Windows 7 media! I say that as someone who has this process pretty well automated through SCCM… There isn’t a reason for ever organization to put so much effort into Win 7 media when the problem could be solved once for everyone – but only Microsoft can do that.

    Thanks for your help!

    1. Thank you for your feedback. We don’t have such an aggressive refresh schedule even for Windows 10 (see second to last paragraph). I will start a mail thread with the relevant peeps, no promises. This is unlikely if the prerequisites for installing Windows 7 updates haven’t changed. Happy deployment!

      1. Dave says:

        As you probably know Andrei, Windows update for Windows 7 is horribly broken, Clean install 7 SP1 > Check for update > Never ending “Searching for updates” and never finds any

        When is MS going to fix WU for 7? – It has been broken since GWX was released

        1. KB3172605, the July update rollup contains the latest Windows Update Agent version for Windows 7, that fixes the following and is what you are looking for:

          This update contains some improvements to Windows Update Client in Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. This includes the following:

          – An optimization that addresses long scan time for updates that’s reported on some computers.
          – Fix for a Windows Update error 0x8007000E on some computers while they are updating.
          – Some reliability improvements.

          The general principle has been discussed in the blog post below:
          https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mniehaus/2016/02/12/build-windows-7-images-faster-by-patching-them-faster/

          1. Dave says:

            Yes thanks, I am aware of how to manually install certain updates to get it working again, but it used to work without doing that, with the exact same install of 7 SP1, why can’t it be fixed at Microsoft’s end so that we can install 7 SP1 > Check for updates > Install updates?

            Why does the end user have to apply fixes for something that is obviously wrong server side at Microsoft’s end?

            Nothing changed inside the 7 SP1 ISO/DVD I use to install 7 with.

          2. Since Windows 7 SP1 has been released, the number of available updates grew and grew with time (over 4000 updates). This is why I published this article, to help with avoiding this problem altogether by refreshing the Windows 7 media.

  4. MELERIX says:

    KB3020369 is not needed, because has been replaced by KB3177467.

    KB3185330 it not needed, because has been replaced by KB3207752.

    1. There is method to my madness:
      KB3177467 is flagged for exclusive install (Must be installed exclusively: Yes) and we wouldn’t be able to add KB3125574 offline, if we use KB3177467 instead of KB3020369.
      Regarding KB3185330: I wrote in the blog, “The last update to install is KB3185330, at the moment of writing this guide, in the future just replace it with the latest monthly/preview rollup, found on the page below”.

      1. MELERIX says:

        “…and we wouldn’t be able to add KB3125574 offline, if we use KB3177467 instead of KB3020369…”

        I did a clean install of Windows 7offline and installed KB3177467 and then installed KB3125574 without troubles, so KB3020369 is not needed anymore.

        1. I am referring to offline servicing:
          https://msdnshared.blob.core.windows.net/media/2017/01/image1310.png

          0x800f082f -2146498513 CBS_E_EXCLUSIVE_WOULD_MERGE The requested operation would merge exclusive and non-exclusive content

          1. MELERIX says:

            ah, I see… you were talking about DISM process offline, I’ve not tested that yet.

  5. James says:

    It would be really nice if Microsoft fixed Windows Update for previous versions of Windows… “aka” Windows Update getting “stuck” and not updating, I have experienced this on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, this is also a wide spread problem, the issue is not caused by the users side.

    Or even better, I would like Microsoft to acknowledge they have made Windows Update function incorrectly for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 on purpose for the sake of making people want to update to Windows 10.

    1. KB3172605, the July update rollup contains the latest Windows Update Agent version for Windows 7, that fixes the following and is what you are looking for:

      This update contains some improvements to Windows Update Client in Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. This includes the following:

      – An optimization that addresses long scan time for updates that’s reported on some computers.
      – Fix for a Windows Update error 0x8007000E on some computers while they are updating.
      – Some reliability improvements.

      For Windows 8.1 the equivalent update is:
      KB3172614

    2. Dave says:

      Exactly, we shouldn’t be having to perform patching and workarounds to fix a problem on Microsoft’s side, it’s fairly transparent that this is a tactic to push people to Windows 10, break WU on previous Windows releases

  6. Andrei Luca says:

    While I am happy to see that Microsoft is releasing these update rollups, I have to state that Microsoft once again is going it’s own way, completely ignoring what the customers need and want. It’s a complete pain in the ass to patch a reference image and no one cares…

      1. OldMX says:

        We know, and We really appreciate You are sharing this information with us.

  7. MELERIX says:

    will be good if Microsoft release an updated ISO of Windows 7 with all of this updates integrated, like they did with Windows 10 ISOs.

    1. Will talk with some other peeps, to see if this is doable.

  8. Cliff Hogan says:

    Andrei

    This article is a very welcome updated reference for the current state of Windows 7 and by extension Windows 2008 R2.
    However, I think the process is missing few pre-requisite patches and those patches are relevant to Enterprise customers.
    The issues are all related to KB3125574 and were discussed previously and at least one person from Microsoft acknowledged the issues. Some of those issues were resolved in KB3185278.
    Please see the details here
    http://windows-update-checker.com/FAQ/ConvenienceRollupKB3125574-Issues.htm

    In summary, at minimum I think all RDP8/8.1 components (KB2574819, KB2592687, KB2830477, KB2857650) and KB2670838 should be installed before KB3125574. There are few other components discussed at that URL, but I think they are not widely in use, so I won’t mention them here.
    Otherwise, to have the image completely and correctly patched, KB3125574 should be reinstalled after the above are installed, one of them being pre-requisite to IE11.

    Note: If KB3125574 is imported in WSUS from the Catalog, the supersedence of the various patches and reinstallation of KB3125574 when required is managed by WSUS.

    1. Hi Cliff,

      thank you for the very detailed suggestions. The problem here is that this does not impact the majority of Win7 users, but it is a problem nonetheless. I also had some difficulties with KB2670838. The main point is, even in this guide, that we do not solely rely on KB3125574 to do everything, with this in mind, I will reach out again to Mike from the other blog and the other owners of KB3125574, to make sure that the entire team is aware of the list of issues from WUC and see what can be done, please don’t expect any immediate changes.

      Thank you and Abbodii, PointZero, Komm for your dedication to this.

  9. DonPick says:

    Thanks for the wonderful guide Andrei, and it’s great to see you blogging these gory details 🙂

  10. Philip Yip says:

    Nice but Microsoft should really just create an up to date Windows 7 Installation .iso with the Latest Serial ATA drivers, NVMe support and USB 3.0 support while they are at it they should remove the prompt to input the Windows 7 key on their website so people can Download the .iso.

    I created a .bat file to do this with written instructions and a tutorial video here:
    http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/software-os/f/3524/t/19999620

    1. abbodi1406 says:

      Windows 7 and 8.1 are in the extended support period, i doubt they would get refreshed installation media

      BTW, CABs can be extracted together with one command 🙂
      expand -f:*Windows*.cab C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\*.msu C:\files\Window7MediaRefresh\CABs

      1. Thank you for the suggestion, will test & write it in.

  11. Chris says:

    Really???? How about re-releasing the RU with the changes?

    1. A new cumulative update rollup is expected sometime in the second half of 2017, as part of the new servicing model.

  12. Wondering about KB2775511 “enterprise hotfix rollup”, released March 2013? Wouldn’t that (and any relevant post KB2775511 hotfixes) be good practice (install first before KB3020369) ? (don’t see anywhere that KB3125574 supersedes KB2775511)

    1. KB2775511 is superseded by KB3125574 by default (not in the exception list documented in KB3125574). When installing KB2775511 we saw problems with long installation time (hours, maybe days), because it has to evaluate a lot of components from the LDR branch (check CBS.log at the time of install to see).

      1. Cliff Hogan says:

        I have seen the same advice before, but it is reinforcing to see it coming from different expert, not necessary related people.
        “KB2775511 is superseded by KB3125574 by default (not in the exception list documented in KB3125574)”

        https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/windowsitpro/2016/05/17/simplifying-updates-for-windows-7-and-8-1/#comment-3016

        1. We (in support) were very happy when KB3125574 was released and could recommend it instead of KB2775511.

  13. MrMX says:

    Two questions:
    1. Can I install KB3020369 and KB3125574 on a live system (vm)? Just saying because I see no point to integrate them in an offline fashion and afterwards fire up a vm and continue with the rest of updates.
    2. Can I use KB3177467 which has superseded KB3020369?

    1. 1. Yes. Doing it offline, we save more time, but it might not be such a big difference.
      2. Yes, recommend rebooting after KB3177467, because of the known issue.

  14. David says:

    So, if I wanted to throw this into an MDT task, I would just add these in order? Which updates need reboots?

    1(Used to be 3).KB3177467 (September 2016 SSU)
    2.KB3125574 (April 2016 Convenience Update Rollup)
    4.KB3172605 (July 2016 Functional Update Rollup, 7C* package)
    5.KB3179573 (August 2016 FUR, 8C* package)
    6.KB2841134 (Internet Explorer 11, Optional)
    NOT 7.KB3185330 (October 2016 Monthly Quality Rollup, 10B’ package [contains September 2016 FUR, 9C* package])
    7. KB3207752 (Jan 2017 Monthly Rollup)

    1. I do not recommend switching KB3177467 with KB3020369, see https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/astoica/2017/01/03/windows-7-refreshed-media-creation/#comment-205 for the reason.

      If you keep KB3020369 as the first one, then you can import KB3020369 and KB3125574 into the “Packages” node as described below:
      https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mniehaus/2016/02/12/build-windows-7-images-faster-by-patching-them-faster/

      The rest can be installed afterwards normally.

      1. David says:

        I looked around but did not find the answer to this; in MDT can you specify the order that packages get installed?

        How do I ensure that KB3020369 gets installed before KB3125574? I know if they were applications, you can use dependencies…

        1. You can use selection profiles, below an example for drivers, but you can do the same for update package and have two “Install Updates Offline” steps, one with the KB3020369 and one with the rest, mainly KB3125574.

          http://deploymentresearch.com/Research/Post/325/MDT-2013-Lite-Touch-Driver-Management

  15. David says:

    Andrei,

    I assume you haven’t thrown all of this into MDT yet. I have, and here’s what I found. KB3125574 is too big to run DISM in WinPE; DISM claims there is not enough space. The only setting I know of to change is the scratch space size in MDT Deployment Share Properties. I’ve upped it to 512 with no luck.

    So I want to understand the reason behind some of these updates.

    Servicing Stack Update (April 2015 or September 2016) = prerequisite for April 2016 Convenience Update
    April 2016 Convenience Update Rollup = Rollup for EVERYTHING Between SP1 and April 2016.
    July and August 2016 Monthly updates = Microsoft moved to a monthly update format, that was NOT cumulative.
    October 2016 (and EVERY monthly going forward) = Microsoft moved to a monthly, cumulative update starting with September.

    Summary:
    Servicing Stack Update
    April 2016 Convenience Update
    July 2016 Monthly
    August 2016 Monthly
    (Current month, Cumulative from this point on)

    Does that sum it up?

    1. David says:

      The reason I’m asking (and for anyone else using MDT), is I think I found the “perfect” order of updates.

      MDTBuild:
      Preinstall> (via Apply Patches, which uses DISM)
      September 2016 Servicing Stack Update
      State Restore> (via Applications)
      April 2016 Convenience Update
      July 2016 Monthly Update
      August 2016 Monthly Update

      MDTProduction: You ARE using separate deployment shares, RIGHT?
      (Current Month) Cumulative Updates

      Using this order gives me the benefit of creating the reference image once, and I can update the Production Deployment share with the current month’s Update, and have a fully patched image at deployment.

      1. Hi David, this guide is not meant for MDT, it is just to discuss a principle of updating the media. Modify and implement this as you see fit for MDT.

        1. David says:

          Is this the reason the these updates? I need to know the logistics and reasoning, so that when I revisit this topic in the future, I will know what needs to be adapted, if anything.

          Servicing Stack Update (April 2015 or September 2016) = prerequisite for April 2016 Convenience Update
          April 2016 Convenience Update Rollup = Rollup for EVERYTHING Between SP1 and April 2016.
          July and August 2016 Monthly updates = Microsoft moved to a monthly update format, that was NOT cumulative.
          October 2016 (and EVERY monthly going forward) = Microsoft moved to a monthly, cumulative update starting with September.

          Summary:
          Servicing Stack Update
          April 2016 Convenience Update
          July 2016 Monthly
          August 2016 Monthly
          (Current month, Cumulative from this point on)

          1. Sorry David, I started to write yesterday a second comment, but I think I closed the website before posting it.

            Your logic is spot on, one small correction, the Monthly Rollups are not yet cumulative, they are additive (everything from October onwards will be installed). They should become cumulative (replace even KB3125574) later this year.

            I would also make the following change to the list:

            Summary:
            Servicing Stack Update (April 2015 to avoid any issues)
            April 2016 Convenience Update
            SSU from September 2016 (to have the latest cbscore.dll version and brings stability improvements)
            July 2016 Monthly
            August 2016 Monthly
            (Current month, Cumulative from this point on)

          2. David says:

            OK, by switching to the word additive, you mean everything from (October 2016 – Current Month) gets installed by just using Current Month, right? And “later this year” they will transition to truly cumulative update (SP1 – Current Month)?

            Two other questions that I haven’t asked before:

            September 2016: Is it included in October 2016?
            Do you have / Can you make update lists for Windows 8.1 and Windows 10? I’m trying to accomplish the same thing with these OS’s, and I’m not sure what is cumulative/additive for what.

            Thanks!!

          3. First paragraph spot on.

            See point no 7 in the beginning:
            KB3185330 (October 2016 Monthly Quality Rollup, 10B’ package [contains September 2016 FUR, 9C* package])

            For Windows 10 it is easy, take the latest SSU and the last CU. Currently:
            KB3211320 & KB3216755

            For Windows 8.1 it is a bit trickier, I will post back after I have checked some things.

          4. David says:

            Andrei,

            Did you ever figure out the “optimal” upgrade path for Windows 8.1?

          5. Hi David, sorry, not yet. Work has been busy. There won’t be such a short list, as there the latest CU is from 2014 (KB3000850).

  16. B-Ran says:

    This is the ONLY guide I have found so far that tells us that only the first couple of updates can be slipped in offline… all the other guides don’t mention that part! I was going nuts trying to figure out why the April 2016 Convenience rollup was as far as I could get. Now I know that I need to pack it up, run it in a VM, install the rest of the updates, then pack it back up into a new .wim file. Whew. Never done that last part before so I’m sure that’ll be fun!

    “KB2841134 (Internet Explorer 11, Optional)” – Nope. That’s not IE11 at all… That’s a spell check dictionary update for IE11! Can’t believe I’m the only one who caught that. IE11 only comes as a 55.7 MB executable file from the main website or as a 262.7 MB file from the Update Catalog site. If one wants to add IE11 to an install disc then it has to be added with special 3rd party software (NTLite or RT Seven Lite) so that it can be installed with (actually after) Windows… but which one of those installation files is absolutely necessary, the big or small one? Oh, well, thanks for writing this blog!

    1. B-Ran says:

      Oops, my mistake about the size of that big IE11 exe. I see now that after clicking “download” in the update catalog that it shows me a ton of .exe files and the en-us version to get is only 53 MB. Alright, well, it’s still an executable and can’t be slipped in with DISM. 😉

      1. No, that is done in the online phase.

      2. abbodi86 says:

        IE11 can be integrated offline just fine
        you either extract inner cab files from the executable with parameter /x:.
        or download it directly:
        https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=43898

        hint: check SetupDownloadList.txt in SetupPolicy.cab for all related files links

        of course, you need to integrate Platfrom Update KB2670838 first, it’s the only prerequisite required, cover all others
        proper integration order would be:
        1- KB3020369 (April 2015 Servicing Stack Update)
        2- KB2670838 (Platfrom Update)
        3- KB2841134 (Internet Explorer 11)
        4- KB3125574 (April 2016 Convenience Update Rollup)
        5- Monthly Quality Rollup

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